August 16, 2021 Content Chat Recap: Content Curation At Scale

A #ContentChat header image that says today's topic is content curation at scale.

Brand communities want to receive valuable content and resources from a range of reputable sources on that brand’s content channelsβ€”not just the company’s owned content. Especially if that owned content is a blatant sales asset.

In this #ContentChat, we explain how to curate content that your community will love. Read the full recap below for tips on how to find the best curated content sources for your community, our favorite content curation tools, and engaging ways to share curated content across your channels.

Q1: What is content curation, and how can it benefit a brand’s marketing strategy?

Content curation is a process in which you identify and share reputable third-party resources with your brand or personal community.

A1a: Content curation is the process of identifying and sharing a vetted selection of other people’s content with your audience. #ContentChat https://t.co/lTZpJIcHOn

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A1.
A collection of #content pieces by
other experts on a certain topic that you put together to provide value for an audience.#ContentChat

β€” Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 16, 2021

A1: #Contentcuration involves sharing third-party resources with your community. By sharing valuable content from reputable sources, you show your community you’re here to help them, instead of just pushing your content on them. #ContentChat

β€” Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 16, 2021

An effective content curation strategy can build your brand reputation, help nurture relationships, and ideally drive website traffic.

A1b: Content curation can benefit your brand in 3 big ways:
* Build your reputation
* Nurture relationships
* Drive website traffic#ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A1c: Curated content also breaks up the monotony of your brand talking about itself and sharing its owned content on social media. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

Yess! Takes the focus from me-content for a bitβ€”adding fresh perspective for your audience. #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

Which builds credibility #ContentChat

β€” Dan Goldberg (@Jonas419) August 16, 2021

The content you curate should lend a perspective on a topic of interest to your community. Ideally, this content will naturally extend from the content you create and answer new questions for your community.

A1b: When you integrate #contentcuration throughout your content channels, you can more effectively address the range of topics that are important to your audience. Share content to spark ideas. Help solve challenges. Lend a perspective that you cannot directly say. #ContentChat

β€” Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 16, 2021

A1: Content curation is a companion to content creation. In addition to content you create, content curation includes accompanying pieces that will also resonate.

It’s a great benefit to any brand hoping to amplify a message w/out making everything about them. #ContentChat

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

100% agree with this.

When you share other people’s content that validates your brand POV, it’s a very positive reflection on your brand and its understanding of industry trends and challenges. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

Content curation can also lighten your team’s content creation needs.

A1. Content curation is gathering content on a specific topic in a creative way.

Example: a Twitter thread on threads to improve writing.

It helps by adding variety and voice to your content marketing strategy while reducing the work of churning out new content. #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

A1. Content curation is creating content based on other people’s content. Providing your own pov and collecting / presenting materials in an easily accessible way helps take off the pressure of creating original content every time #ContentChat

β€” Manisha (@ManishaDot) August 16, 2021

For brand such as @morganstanley, #contentcreation can be broad in scope.
For example, I covered a @morganstanley event and wrote a profile of their guest @Martina. It was about her career & what pushed her to succeed in spite of big obstacles for #women in tennis.#ContentChat pic.twitter.com/sCuox5UM9B

β€” Rose Horowitz, #WomentoFollow, #SreeShow (@RoseHorowitz31) August 16, 2021

Q2: How do you identify the best curated content sources for your community?

Audience research is essential to find your community’s preferred content sources. Start by talking with customers or peers as relevant, and validate this information with a broader reader survey.

A2a: To identify the industry resources your brand community values but may not regularly read, you’ll want to conduct audience research. I suggest you start by talking with willing customers, then validate your findings with a readership survey. #ContentChat https://t.co/8hSAkscaJX

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A2: For curation sources that will speak to your community, use this trick.

Choose a random sample of followers (@ least 5 but no more than 20) & see which news outlets or publications they follow. Is there crossover? If so, you have a small list of where to start. #ContentChat pic.twitter.com/8YPnI2Nbl1

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

A2: I like connecting with individuals on other channels (LinkedIn, Twitter, conferences) and finding quality content after connecting with them. If I connect with someone on #ContentChat, for example, and like their POV, I’ll seek out where they share their content!

β€” Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 16, 2021

Identify thought leaders in your space and follow them on social media, subscribe to their newsletter, and regularly visit their blog. If relevant, you can create a Google Alert to be alerted of new content on key topics.

A2.
πŸ’‘Follow and connect with topic thought leaders on #SocialMedia
πŸ’‘Subscribe to newsletters + blogs
πŸ’‘Use Google Alerts and Google Trends
πŸ’‘Do research via search engines and Social Media#ContentChat

β€” Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 16, 2021

A2. By identifying where people for my community or topics I am interested in are most active. Mostly social media networks, newsletters work. #ContentChat

β€” Manisha (@ManishaDot) August 16, 2021

Tools like Feedly are helpful for content curation, and we share more tool recommendations in Q6.

A2.

β€’ Use curation tools like Feedly to track content topics that interest your audience.

β€’ Follow industry relevant newsletters, podcasts, and publications.

β€’ Ask your audience and share it with the rest of your audience. #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

When evaluating sources, Erika recommends you avoid sites that have spammy ads or pop-ups that detract from the reader experience. If a piece of content does not link to its sources, do not share that content.

A2b: When evaluating curated content sources, I look for sites that don’t put spammy ads + pop-ups between your click and getting to the content you came for and that cite their sources. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

And be conscious of if sites disclose compensation or conflicts of interest (i.e. a paid engagement masked as general “thought leadership”).

A2c: I don’t share content from sites that don’t clearly disclose compensation or conflicts of interest, including positioning paid clients as thought leaders without mentioning that relationship. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

What are some red flags to look out for when it comes to sites like this? #ContentChat

β€” Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 16, 2021

This is a great question!

In some cases, due to other content (like conference presentations) I know about the paid relationship. But another flag can be when there are several people from the same company constantly being quoted that you don’t see anywhere else. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

Q3: What goals can content curation support?

Content curation can support a range of business goals. Erika and the community most often use content curation to support thought leadership, influencer outreach, website engagement, lead nurturing, and brand building objectives.

A3a: I typically use content curation to support five business objectives:
* Thought Leadership
* Influencer Outreach
* Website Engagement
* Lead Nurturing
* Brand Building#ContentChat pic.twitter.com/jsXGUT2TLJ

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A3b: Each of these five objectives needs different tools to execute against, which we’ll get to a little later in the chat. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

To drill into specifics, effective content curation provides value to your audience, nurtures your relationship with them, and can help drive engagement on your channels.

A3.
🏁 Providing value to your audience
🏁 Commenting, connecting and sharing your opinions on the content boosts your status as thought leader
🏁 #Branding – You got the oversight of the topic#ContentChat

β€” Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 16, 2021

A3. Goals content curation supports include:

β€’ Consistently sharing valuable content with your audience
β€’ Building and growing your network
β€’ Learning as you read, gather, and comment on curated content
β€’ Better connections with your community #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

Content curation places your brand within the larger industry that you and your customers operate. It invites conversation and engagement.

A3 Content curation and sharing content from other sources can demonstrate that you’re not self-involved. It can also show that you want to be part of the conversation, not just self-promote. #contentchat

β€” Martin Lieberman (@martinlieberman) August 16, 2021

Yes!!! It makes me sad when I see a profile that’s just an outward blast of content. Misses the social component of #socialmedia completely. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A3: It builds better relationships with people in the industry and boosts your reputation. Ultimately, this all can support your backlinking strategy and boost that SEO. #ContentChat

β€” Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 16, 2021

Rachel explains how content curation is a springboard for expertise, exposure, and ease:

A3: Content curation is a great springboard for the 3 E’s:

Expertise: Sharing good resources means people will begin to trust your opinions.

Exposure: Talking about what other people are talking about shows you’re in the loop.

Ease: No excuses for not posting. #ContentChat

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

Q4: What does your content curation process look like?

At a high level, most marketers first find their curated content, organize that content, and then share it in a variety of formats across channels.

A4a: At a high level, an efficient #contentcuration process looks like:

1.) FIND great content to share
2.) ORGANIZE the content you curate by using the right tools
3.) SHARE that content in a variety of formats across your comms channels#ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A4. Mine involves saving content from communities I’m involved on LinkedIn, Twitter, Slack, and Newsletters.
Occasionally, I’ll curate pieces from Feedly.

I save all the stuff in my Pocket. Read, make notes and gather my thoughts.

Then, share or link to it. #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

A4: I actually do a combo of your answers πŸ™‚

I set aside some time each day to catch up on news and content (usually in the a.m. with my tea).

As I find content, I organize it into a @trello board or schedule it into @MeetEdgar. #ContentChat

β€” Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 16, 2021

1. Define relevant topics and your target audience
2. Find awesome content
3. Plan and create curated content
4. Share content with your audience across channels
5. Analyze the results#ContentChat

β€” PR Power (@PowerPR_story) August 16, 2021

Finding content can take a considerable amount of time if you are not focused. It is easy to get lost in the day’s news or your social feeds, and before you know it 2 hours have passed and you have nothing to share.

A4b: In contrast, for a lot of people, their content curation process is something along the lines of logging in to their computer first thing, scanning their social media channels, sharing a few items, and wondering where the past 2 hours went.#ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

Ugh! This is often what leads to sharing pieces that they’ve rarely read themselves. #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

Agreed. I think many of those cases come from using free or cheap tools that rely a little too heavily on the number of shares a piece has already gotten, which is something easily gamed. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

Melanie recommends filtering newsletters into a separate email folder so that you can review them during a set time.

As a side note: I’ve started filtering newsletters into a separate folder, out of my inbox, so they’re waiting for me during this content curation time I set aside (and they don’t distract me at other times). #ContentChat

β€” Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 16, 2021

Rachel sets aside one day a week to find content to curate for her clients.

A4: For my personal brand, curation is an “as needed” tool I employ when I can’t get my content right. I share a post from someone that has cracked the code to encourage myself + my followers.

For my clients, I spend 1 day a week finding potential pieces to use. #ContentChat

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

Q5: What channels can marketers use for content curation?

Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn are often the first channels that marketers think of for content curation, but don’t limit yourself to those three (or any combination of social channels). Share content in blog posts, podcasts, email newsletters, within your brand communities, and in any internal communications channels like Slack or your intranet.

A5a: Marketers primarily think about sharing curated content on the big 3 social channels, but you canβ€”and shouldβ€”also share content in blog posts, email newsletters, brand communities, and internal communications channels like Slack and your intranet. #ContentChat https://t.co/PYqGYFQCTz

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A5b: I think @Pinterest is an often overlooked channel for brands to share curated content. I personally have a couple of #contentmarketing boards that are almost 100% other people’s content. #ContentChat https://t.co/mQIklbTFPF

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A5: In addition to social media, we always set aside sections of our monthly newsletter for outside content that we think our audience would appreciate. #ContentChat

β€” Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 16, 2021

It’s a good callout about blog posts. I think that’s where a solid organization tool comes into play — you can bookmark/save articles that may be relevant sources for your own future content. #ContentChat

β€” Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 16, 2021

Exactly! @AlekIrvin and I do a lot of blog posts like that for clients, using a combination of links we’ve saved and search. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

Think of your customer journey. What channels do they engage on throughout their day?

A5: Content channels are everywhere, which overwhelms some!

Every morning, your phone tells you what’s going on in the world, whether in your news app or in a channel like Twitter or FB.

Your inbox is full of newsletters that curate content, too.

Start there. #ContentChat pic.twitter.com/Py5cpb7VOb

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

A5. It depends: on your audience, the topic and what is the best format to bring your point across. Using another format than the original sources might be helpful + provides additional value.
πŸ“’ #SocialMedia
πŸ“’ #Podcast or Video
πŸ“’ Whitepaper or Checklist
πŸ“’ Blog#ContentChat pic.twitter.com/crXLdsrdmm

β€” Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 16, 2021

Regardless of the channel(s) you prioritize, explain why a piece of content is relevant and be creative in how you share the content. Your audience will gain no value from a laundry list of links.

A5. Curate content on all channels from socials to newsletter to podcasts and your blog.

The key is to be creative with how you share though.

Meaning: don’t share a laundry list of links with zero insights from your end. #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

This literally shows you’ve done zero amount of work and are sharing links for the sake of it. #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

Q6: What content curation tools do you recommend?

Check out all the content curation tools and resource recommendations below. They include Feedly, Flipboard, Evernote, Pocket, Bear Notes App, blog and industry publication RSS feeds, and more.

A6a: I like to use @feedly to track everything from blog and industry publication RSS feeds to Twitter hashtags. The pro version even allows me to keep an eye on Reddit. #ContentChat https://t.co/IncTGRLQh8

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A6b: When asking for team members to collaborate and contribute to the #contentcuration process, I like to create a group @Flipboard to make it easy for them to flag content to me. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A6c: And as I mentioned to @inkandcopy, whenever I read something awesome that I know I will want to quote, link to, or share in the future, I save it to an appropriate @Evernote notebook. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A6.

β€’ Feedly for reading the latest on the topic.

β€’ Twitter, Slack and other channels for sourcing content from your community.

β€’ Pocket + Bear Notes App for organizing #ContentChat

β€” Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 16, 2021

Are RSS feeds still a thing? I thought they went out with microfiche (google it kids) #ContentChat

β€” Dan Goldberg (@Jonas419) August 16, 2021

Many CMS platforms have RSS built in. It’s a lot more convenient than going out to a site to see if they have anything new you want to read. You can also use RSS to keep an eye on brand mentions via a Google alert. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A6: @readwiseio @feed_otter #contentchat

β€” Chris (@chris_byrne) August 16, 2021

A6. Twitter, IG communities
– Newsletters
– Pocket to save content
– Notes app for writing down all the random thoughts I have while reading/ watching content#ContentChat

β€” Manisha (@ManishaDot) August 16, 2021

Per Martin, the key to effective content curation is to share it in a way that shows why you care and why your community should, too. Which leads us to our final question…

A6 Pay attention. Subscribe to good email newsletters. Follow the right people. If you want to be unique in your curation, you need to find your own content and share it in a way that demonstrates why you care — and why others should, too. #contentchat

β€” Martin Lieberman (@martinlieberman) August 16, 2021

Q7: How can marketers share curated content with their community in a fun, engaging, and natural way?

Do not auto-share every headline of a potentially relevant post in your content curation channels. You need to share content in a way that encourages people to engage.

A7a: First of all, don’t automate the social sharing of your curated content! If you whitelist a domain’s RSS feed in your social media platform, and auto-share every headline of every post, you’re only adding noise to your social feed. #ContentChat https://t.co/zkuUDDUzoP

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A7 For one thing, don’t just share the headline and URL. Share content in a way that will engage people and start conversations. Ask follow-up/related questions. Find interesting quotes. Share like a human, not a brand. #contentchat

β€” Martin Lieberman (@martinlieberman) August 16, 2021

Explain why a piece of content resonated with you/your team or why you may disagree with it. Or, explain how you would take the piece further and add a piece of advice or an area that could also be explored.

A7b: Instead, share your POV on why the content resonated with you (or why you disagree with its premise), add a mention of something the piece didn’t include but should have, or share a quote that stood out to you. TL&DR give context! #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

A7.
Don’t just copy + hit share.
Make up your mind, give a statement or helpful summary, share your personal thoughts and add a spin with storytelling. Interact + motivate your audience to engage, maybe with a poll or making a ‘bold’ statement to start conversations#ContentChat

β€” Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 16, 2021

Ask a question to your community.

A7: Share your feedback. Offer a unique opinion. Ask a question. Bottom line: Keep the conversation going. #ContentChat

β€” Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 16, 2021

A7. Offer their own pov along with the OG content and ask questions for their audience’s thoughts #ContentChat

β€” Manisha (@ManishaDot) August 16, 2021

And include a call to action like the ones Rachel recommends below:

A7a: Marketers can make curated content personal by including unique CTAs:

1. This piece is great for ______.
2. Read this and can’t stop thinking about _______.
3. We’re thinking _____ should be added to this list.
#ContentChat

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

I like these. For #3, I’d also add “What would you add?” That’ll prompt people to click and see what’s already there *and* reply. #contentchat

β€” Martin Lieberman (@martinlieberman) August 16, 2021

It’s my hope that whatever I write in #3 is a prompt to get them to reply without me having to ask for it.

Not every audience enjoys being put on the spot, so that’s my way to sneak reactions and replies in from the shy ones. 😁 #ContentChat

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

Do not simply post a link with “Thoughts?” This posting style is common to spark disagreement amongst followers, and it could support unhealthy discourse in your communities (which will eventually tarnish your brand reputation).

A7b: Unless you’re a white dude on LinkedIn. Then just post the link & go, “Thoughts?” #ContentChat

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

That’s my least favorite content curation trope.

It says to me someone is sharing to spark disagreement amongst followers, or, worse, trying to decide whose opinion to glom onto. It’s lazy, really. #ContentChat

β€” Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 16, 2021

It’s obnoxious. Almost like a taunt. Like, “Do you dare say something to me about this and my brilliance for sharing?” πŸ™„ It’s not enjoyable for any party. #ContentChat

β€” Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 16, 2021

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