August 23, 2021 Content Chat Recap: So You Want To Be A Content Marketing Or Public Relations Freelancer

A #ContentChat header image that says today's topic is so you want to be a content marketing or public relations freelancer, with guest Michelle Garrett.

Have you considered leaving your traditional 9-5 job to pursue freelance content marketing or public relations work? Or do you hope to raise some extra cash on the side by freelancing?

In this #ContentChat, we’re joined by Michelle Garrett, PR consultant, to discuss how to get started with freelance communications work. Read the full recap below, where we explain the benefits of engaging in freelance opportunities, how to find freelance work, solutions to common pitfalls that many freelancers face, and much more. If your freelancing question was not answered, let us know in the comments so we can help!

Q1: What are the benefits of pursuing freelance content marketing or public relations work? If you switched from in-house or agency to freelance, why did you make the change?

There are many benefits of freelancing. For starters, you can be your own boss and can choose who you work with…

A1a: There are MANY benefits, I’ve found. I love being my own boss and having the freedom to set my schedule and choose who I work with. It’s a lifestyle for me – one I couldn’t have without being my own boss. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

A1: I moved into freelance life from an agency because I wanted the freedom to choose the clients and projects I worked on, to enable me to do my best work. There’s no going back now!#ContentChat https://t.co/yhjqq2X3nZ

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

A1: The biggest benefit I see to freelance content marketing, or content of any kind, is that you can work with whatever clients you want. You yourself are also a client, and as you promote your work, you get better at what you do + get better leads. #ContentChat

— Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 23, 2021

A1: Benefits are many. The ability to pick the projects & people I do or do not want to work on is probably the biggest benefit. I love what I do and enjoy the folks I work with. It’s cheesy, but event though I work long hours it doesn’t feel like work. Zero dread. #ContentChat

— 🟣 Jennifer Navarrete (@epodcaster) August 23, 2021

A1a: I never planned on going freelance, but city life gradually wore on me (rent, daily commute) and I needed to move/reset. I was able to transition to freelance for my agency at the time. I would now have a VERY hard time giving up the perks of freelancing. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

Which includes the freedom to pursue long-term or short-term collaborations with agencies and companies alike.

A1. I like to have the best of both worlds. I prefer long-term collaborations with companies and agencies, but as a freelancer. #ContentChat

— Teodora Ema Pirciu (@EmaPirciu) August 23, 2021

This diverse mix of clients can allow you to tap into more of your marketing skills.

A1 – In my experience, it gave me a wider range of clients to work with. It also gave me a chance to use my less tapped into skills in my digital comms repertoire. #ContentChat pic.twitter.com/bmZv1gkFN9

— 👨🏾‍💻Musolé | #CreateYourMoment (@Musolek) August 23, 2021

Many freelancers find a healthier work/life balance than before. That is not to suggest that freelancers never work late hours. But late-night work is more a matter of choice when you freelance…

A1b: The benefits of freelancing include (just for starters):
– Flexibility for a healthier work/life balance
– Near-total control over my hours (I used to work after 6 p.m often…. not anymore)
– Ability to work with a ton of people I love working with!#ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

That’s one of the first things I noticed going freelance – I rarely work past 5. Gave me a new (healthier) definition of work/life balance. #ContentChat

— Monina Wagner (@MoninaW) August 23, 2021

I spend a fair amount of time working in the evenings but I like that it’s my choice and I’m being forced. #ContentChat

— Shane Carpenter (@dshanecarpenter) August 23, 2021

Important to distinguish that it is your choice. I used to work late because I felt I had to. Churn and burn is real. #ContentChat

— Monina Wagner (@MoninaW) August 23, 2021

I did too but then one day I decided I was done at 5:00 and I found out the world wouldn’t end. #ContentChat.

— Shane Carpenter (@dshanecarpenter) August 23, 2021

No joke, I didn’t realize how much time I actually had between 5pm and bedtime. With the exception of dinner, the laptop was always on. The 5pm rule for me is a gamechanger. #ContentChat

— Monina Wagner (@MoninaW) August 23, 2021

This balance includes the ability to juggle errands and miscellaneous life tasks at more convenient times.

One thing that folks may not know is that going to the grocery store and movie theater during the work week is a much better experiences vs. nights/weekends. #ContentChat

— 🟣 Jennifer Navarrete (@epodcaster) August 23, 2021

It is pretty nice to be able to run out to do errands – without having to notify anyone you’ll be OOO. 😆#ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

We recommend you get at least three years of agency or in-house experience before going freelance. You will develop your skills and expand your network much faster at an agency than if you go right to freelance work.

A1b: The last job I had was w/ a PR agency (because my mentor told me I needed to have that experience before hanging out my own shingle). Great advice–although that year was 1 of the toughest of my professional life. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

A1c: So when I did the agency stint, it was always with the goal in mind of starting my own biz. I couldn’t have/wouldn’t have worked there long-term. I saw how I could offer clients what they needed at a lower cost. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Learned a lot–but oof, it was ROUGH. Lots of carrot dangling. Long hours. Difficult clients. I’d come home and collapse. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

A1c: For anyone about to graduate college, I recommend you get at least 3-6 years of agency or in-house experience before attempting to go freelance. You’ll learn more and greatly expand your network before going freelance. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

I second this. I went out on my own after a long time working in-house, and a year at an agency to help me understand how to make a business of it, above and beyond trading dollars for my hours as a solopreneur. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

This is VERY true… At least *some* agency experience will help prepare you – and yes, you’ll meet a lot of great contacts. My agency co-workers still refer work to me all these years later. #ContentChat https://t.co/LD63Dbtoya

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Q2: How can freelancers find relevant communications and content creation opportunities? What methods, sites, or tools do you recommend?

Your network with play a pivotal role in helping sustain your freelance career. This is not to say you need a massive network. But, you need at least a handful of professionals in your space that are happy to connect you to opportunities as they find them.

You can build these relationships on social media. Consistently engage with professionals in your space, share your knowledge, and ask for help. Over time, you will develop deeper relationships that could lead to freelance opportunities.

A2b: I think Twitter & LinkedIn are both good platforms to use to connect with others & look for opportunities. & staying in touch with your connections. Your clients can also be good sources of referrals. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

A2. I highly recommend focusing your energy building relationships on channels like Twitter and LinkedIn. By engaging consistently, you can show your knowledge and skillset, opening up tons of opportunities. #ContentChat

— Anthony Gaenzle (@AnthonyGaenzle) August 23, 2021

A2a: My network has sustained my freelance work in ways I never thought possible. Stay in touch with your former in-house or agency colleagues, and welcome the chance to make new connections. Help them when they need help. Take time to catch up as individuals. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

A2b: When people know of work opportunities, they’ll turn to the people they know, trust, and would want to work with. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

Pursue opportunities to contribute your content to other websites or content channels. It will showcase your expertise and widen your potential reach.

A2a: I find opportunities a few ways:
Through referrals.
Through my site (search, blogging)
Through my contributed guest posts
Through social media
#ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

A2: Sometimes the best way to find work is for that work to find you. Be visible. Use your client skills for yourself. Folks will contact you and ask you to do for them what you are doing for yourself. That type of warm contact is gold. #ContentChat

— 🟣 Jennifer Navarrete (@epodcaster) August 23, 2021

Yes, sometimes I say I use myself as a guinea pig when it comes to guest posts/contributed article/social media/self publishing. It helps my biz – but also I can use what I learn to help clients. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

I always use myself as the guinea pig. It wouldn’t feel right to advise a client to do something that I’ve never done before. #ContentChat

— Shane Carpenter (@dshanecarpenter) August 23, 2021

Completely agree! It’s always surprising to me when I see an agency charging a client for those learnings. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

Don’t be afraid to self-promote!

A2c: I have a line in my email signature: “The best compliment you can give is a referral.”

I also have a self-employed friend who often says, “Don’t keep me a secret.” I like that.
#ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Erika recommends a handful of Slack communities and other resources for freelance work.

A2a: I’m a member of a number of marketing Slack communities that all have job channels that frequently have freelance openings. Women in Revenue, CMworld, and Content Marketing Leaders to name a few of the more active. #ContentChat https://t.co/Xz8kvy8hfu

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

A2b: I’m also signed up with @contently, @marketingdive’s studio, and @Skyword. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

Sites/tools like Upwork, Remote PR Jobs, and LinkedIn ProFinder can accelerate your search. However, keep in mind that some freelance-focused communities support unhealthy pricing practices in the industry (no, freelancers should not be paid $1 for a page of content).

A2. I still use @Upwork to get new clients, but not as much as I used to. I have several retainer clients who keep me busy. I found them on platforms for freelancers or they found me on LinkedIn. #ContentChat

— Teodora Ema Pirciu (@EmaPirciu) August 23, 2021

A2c: For #publicrelations, @RemotePRJobs was well worth the investment. I know the site has changed a lot since I used it, and there’s likely more value than before. But the free trial will help you gauge if it’s the right fit for you 🙂 #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

A2 – Word of mouth was/is the best tool. Upwork, LinkedIn ProFinder might be worth a try too. #ContentChat

— 👨🏾‍💻Musolé | #CreateYourMoment (@Musolek) August 23, 2021

A2d: I don’t recommend platforms like Upwork for finding work. It drives down the quality/price of freelance work (although I know there are freelancers who use & like those services). #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

And Rachel shares the email she uses to reach out to companies that are hiring more marketing team members:

A2A: Of course, referrals are one of the easiest ways to get & maintain opportunities, but there are others.

If there’s a space I know I want to work in, I see who the big players are. If they’re hiring in any capacity, especially marketing, I email them this: #ContentChat

— Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 23, 2021

A2B: “I see you’re hiring for X! I hope that you find just the right person. And should that person need any support on a freelance basis, I’m available!” #ContentChat

— Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 23, 2021

Erika’s biweekly Content Chat Bulletin email newsletter spotlights at least three content marketing jobs each edition! Sign up below.

A2c: As an aside, we also feature interesting #contentmarketing FT and freelance gigs in the biweekly Content Chat Bulletin newsletter. #ContentChat https://t.co/5tLMvEM0w2

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

Q3: What foundational elements do you recommend that all freelancers prepare to best serve their clients (tools, templates, practices, etc.)?

Your ideal freelance toolkit will depend on the type of work you do. However, free tools like the Google Drive suite are a solid foundation for most of your day-to-day work.

A3a: It really varies, depending on the type of work you do. When I started, I had simple systems in place with spreadsheets – now we use Google sheets – and of course, there are MANY tools (too many?). Dubsado is one I’ve been playing with. #contentchat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Agreed. I’ve found a system of tools I use & for now they work well. I’m hesitant to get lost in shiny new tools because of the time it takes to learn them and then if I like them to transfer everything over. New tools can be disruptive before they’re helpful. #ContentChat

— 🟣 Jennifer Navarrete (@epodcaster) August 23, 2021

All freelancers need a way to track their projects, including hours worked and invoices. We share a few recommendations below.

A3a: As a freelancer, you need tools for tracking your projects, including your client hours and invoices. I use @freshbooks and @redboothHQ for those tasks. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

A3b: You need an invoicing system – it can be simple if you just work with a few clients. Be sure to follow up if a client pays late. Sometimes, the invoice has gotten lost. #contentchat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

I use PayPal for invoicing and it’s pretty convenient. Keep in mind, though, that it costs a fee to transfer your PayPal balance to a bank account. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

Create templates for elements of your core service offering(s), like social media channel audit templates, thought leadership plans, and overviews of the services you provide.

A3b: I’ve created a number of templates for client style guides, social and content audits, thought leadership plans, etc. And they all live in Google Drive. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

Mine are on Google Drive as well but I’ve been playing with @NotionHQ lately and I’ve got to say, I really like it. Google Drive may turn into the backup site. #ContentChat

— Shane Carpenter (@dshanecarpenter) August 23, 2021

A3: Prepare as many general “here’s what I do”/service overview emails to quickly explain to prospective clients (or curious friends/former colleagues) the services you provide and any case studies/examples of that work. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

Curious as to how detailed your initial emails are. Clearly they’re not SOWs but how much do you detail? #ContentChat

— Monina Wagner (@MoninaW) August 23, 2021

2-3 paragraphs + a few bullets that explain:
– Your 2-3 primary service offerings
– Examples of recent work + relevant brands you’ve represented
Attach your resume and offer to chat more. I usually discuss specifics on the call and then draft an SOW. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

Christian recommends Trello and Asana, both of which help many of our community members.

A3.
Tools like @googledrive, @trello or @asana can help to save files, make lists and keeping track of to do’s or the status of #writing or projects in general regarding your business.#Contentchat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 23, 2021

Q4: Let’s explore the legal side. What paperwork or requirements will freelancers need to conduct their business? Should you use a consulting agreement or contract?

Quick disclaimer: Any answers for Q4 and Q5 should not be construed as legal advice, but simply information to help inform your decision-making.

Michelle recommends you sign a consulting agreement before work begins. Ideally, the client will pay at least in part upfront, especially if they are a new client. This will protect you in the event that the client disappears or does not follow through on payment.

A4a: I prefer clients sign a consulting agreement before work begins (& that they pay at least in part upfront, esp when working w/a new client). There are svcs you can use for contracts (@thepixellawyer is 1). Can be a simple agreement & you can attach your SOW. #contentchat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

This contract should detail the specific scope of work, details for payment, and the project timeline.

A4: I’m not a lawyer so this is not to be construed as legal advice. Ahem.

I always have an initial contract, including a specific statement of work and payment details before starting work with a client. I also recommend working with an accountant or a tax firm. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

A4: I do use an agreement. It outlines the basics: services, timeline, payment, accountability. Nothing fancy, but it works. #ContentChat

— 🟣 Jennifer Navarrete (@epodcaster) August 23, 2021

Erika recommends Rocket Lawyer’s templates and document builders. Some sites also offer their own form of contract for freelance workers and their clients.

If you don’t have a template you love, check out @RocketLawyer -so many useful document builders. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

A4. I work better when I have a contract or an UpWork agreement. Sometimes, I also have to sign NDAs, and they help build trust with customers overtime. #ContentChat

— Teodora Ema Pirciu (@EmaPirciu) August 23, 2021

Have your client sign the agreement first, and ensure that they did not make any changes to the agreement without your approval prior to your signing.

A4b: Do check after the client signs and before you sign the agreement to ensure the client made no changes without your approval. I once had a client who added work to SOW without discussing it first. Shady business. #contentchat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Q5: What items are typically tax deductible for freelancers?

A lot of items and activities can be tax-deductible for freelancers, including conferences, courses, professional membership, and some technology and supplies (for professional use).

A5: There are a lot of business development and advertising activities that can be tax-deductible for your freelance business. Conferences, courses, memberships, etc. are some of the things that may be write-offs. But it’s important to work with a tax specialist. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

However, it depends on where you live and how your work/business is classified.

A5. It depends on where you pay taxes. For me, the answer is nothing. But that’s only because I’m registered as an independent service provider and have other advantages.
Always pay the accountant to guide you through the tax labyrinth. #ContentChat

— Teodora Ema Pirciu (@EmaPirciu) August 23, 2021

Per Michelle and the community, we recommend you get an accountant who has experience with freelancers/self-employed people to help you.

A5: On this note, I recommend finding a good accountant who works with freelancers/self-employed people to advise you. That was one of the first things I did when I started my freelance business. #contentchat pic.twitter.com/wayUCZy3k0

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

@PRisUs, I tried to take on a lot of the financial side of my business myself at first. I used Freshbooks and some other tools. But you’re 100%. Not only do I not have the expertise there, I also don’t have the time. Bringing on a pro is very helpful. #ContentChat

— Anthony Gaenzle (@AnthonyGaenzle) August 23, 2021

This 100%. We found an accountant who not only did our taxes, but acted as a financial advisor.

He had similar clients to us and could tell us whether our profit margins were what they should be.

Encouraged us to work more efficiently and charge more! Helpful.

— Andy Strote: Creative Business Advice (@StroteBook) August 23, 2021

I’m doing my first year accounts at the moment and my accountant has been ace. She’s been answering my questions via messenger since I set up. And now she did my accounts and sent A Loom explaining them then we did a zoom on Friday.

— Ayo Abbas (@AyoAbbas) August 24, 2021

Q6: What common pitfalls will most marketing freelancers face, and how do you recommend we overcome these?

There are many potential pitfalls of freelancing, most of which become less scary the longer you freelance and the stronger your network becomes. For starters, it can be challenging to focus on current business while also lining up future opportunities (which is an ongoing task)…

A6: One is not thinking ahead. If you’re busy with client work, you may not be thinking about marketing your business or staying in touch with people (aka networking)–but you really need to be doing this ALL the time. #contentchat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

If you stop–you may find yourself without any new clients or projects. Not a fun place to be. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Which relates to another pitfall: all freelancers will eventually have a client to pay, or they will hit a dry spell with work. Per Michelle, try to secure payment before you start work on your project, if possible, and Erika recommends you always have a financial cushion and backup plan in case you run into hurdles.

A6a: Every freelancer will eventually have a client who refuses to pay and a dry spell without any work.

The key is to always have a financial cushion (and a plan b) so you don’t feel pushed back into a FT job working for someone else. #ContentChat https://t.co/xjWYEUHqB2

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

A6b: It’s really helpful to build your own personal network of freelancers who do similar work. It’s great for the support of others who have had the same challenges, and for referrals to and from other fantastic freelancers. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

A6a: I hope this never happens to anyone, but you may face a situation where a client does not pay (even after repeated follow-ups). This is why a consulting agreement/contract can be helpful. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

Truthfully, it’s much better to get paid up front if you can – because we have little recourse if they decide not to pay… Most self-employed freelance folks aren’t going to court unless it’s a lot of $. So work with good, honest clients. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Diversify the ways that you market your business. Consider contributing articles to third-party sites, attending networking events, joining a Twitter chat, or any other activity you may enjoy that could increase awareness of your business.

A6b: It’s better if you find a few ways to market your business that you enjoy – maybe that’s writing contributed articles – maybe it’s attending networking events – maybe it’s attending Twitter chats – or some combination of things. #contentchat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

“No” is a powerful tool for freelancers. Become comfortable saying no to business, especially if your plate is already too full or if you feel the client simply isn’t a fit for your business.

A6. Sometimes, it takes us too long to learn to say NO.

Freelancers shouldn’t feel guilty for refusing job opportunities that aren’t a for or letting bad clients go. #ContentChat

— Teodora Ema Pirciu (@EmaPirciu) August 23, 2021

Yes, the faster we know how to say no the happier we will be in our business. I will refer out to other freelancers. #ContentChat

— 🟣 Jennifer Navarrete (@epodcaster) August 23, 2021

I am always referring prospects to other freelancers and small agencies whom I think will be a better fit. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

Saying no is something you learn – but it can be hard. I had that Scarlett O’Hara mindset – “I’ll never be hungry again.” But – you learn that you don’t have to take *every* project – and in fact, you shouldn’t. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

You have to learn to listen to your internal red flag detector—including the internal indicators that you are at capacity. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

Trust in your abilities as a freelancer. Self-doubt is common, but that is why we have networks to support us and remind us that we know what we’re doing.

A6b: Another common freelancing pitfall: self-doubt. It is understandable to question yourself when you’re a team of one. Remember: You are capable. You have the skills. Just set out to help your client(s) meet their goals, and learn as you go. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

Remind people that you work for yourself and always appreciate referrals.

A6c: Don’t be afraid to remind people you work for yourself & *always* appreciate referrals. Also don’t hold back letting ppl know what you do. Sometimes they don’t remember-so post on social re: ur work, ur wins, etc. Not in an obnoxious way, but occasionally share #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Shameless self-promotion doesn’t have to be spammy or awful! #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 23, 2021

And no matter what, do not let a single account mishap or failure let you down. Mistakes happen. Learn what you can and move on. In some cases a client simply isn’t a fit for your business, and that’s OK.

A6c: Don’t let a single account mishap or failure let you down. Learn what you can from the situation and move on. Remember that you/your services aren’t the best fit for everyone. That’s OK. Go find the clients that appreciate and value the work you do. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 23, 2021

Q7: Where do you go for resources and tips for freelance content marketing or public relations pros?

Twitter and Twitter Chats are a great way to make freelance connections! Check out Michelle’s #FreelanceChat Thursdays at 9 a.m. Pacific/noon Eastern.

A7a: I love Twitter for making connections with other freelancers – and I learn a lot from them.
#ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

A7b: I started a Twitter chat just for freelancers, #FreelanceChat, which is every Thurs. at noon ET. Any freelancer is welcome. We have a very warm, welcoming, helpful community. We’re hitting our third anniversary very soon. 🙌 #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

Follow these individuals and brands for expert tips and resources for navigating freelance communications work.

A7c: Some great resources I trust are @kat_boogaard, @cjhayden, @drfreelance, @freelancersu – @meledits Deliberate Freelancer podcast is a good resource, too.
#ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

A couple of great sites out there that may or may not be under people’s radar…

1. https://t.co/0utqmFjusr – @FreelancerFAQs
2. https://t.co/yMtNmINg7l – @WoFreelancers

Definitely recommend checking out both. Lots of excellent advice. #ContentChat

— Anthony Gaenzle (@AnthonyGaenzle) August 23, 2021

A7. I learned most of what I know about content marketing from @HubSpotAcademy.
Social media’s been helpful, too.
I found many terrific resources thanks to my Twitter and LinkedIn connections. #ContentChat

— Teodora Ema Pirciu (@EmaPirciu) August 23, 2021

A7: For public relations, we seek advice from @muckrack. Their tips are the best because they are very useful and data-driven. #ContentChat

— VirtuDesk (@virtudeskcom) August 23, 2021

And check out Company of One by Paul Jarvis.

A7d: And, I just started reading “Company of One” by @pjrvs and he talks about so many of the things I believe in that have helped me be in business for myself 20+ years. Highly recommend. #ContentChat

— Michelle Garrett (@PRisUs) August 23, 2021

That book is so great. A must read for every freelancer I think. The chapter on personality is the best. https://t.co/0NFNzD2WF6

— Chris Brown (@thepixellawyer) August 23, 2021

funny story here is that i had to defend to the publisher to keep it in, and it’s by far the chapter people tell me they like the most.

— p (@pjrvs) August 23, 2021

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