February 6, 2023 Content Chat Recap: Job Hunting Tactics for Content Marketers in 2023

A Content Chat header image that says today’s topic is Tactics for Job Hunting For Content Marketers in 2023 with guest Andi Robinson, who is @HijinxMarketing on Twitter.

Job hunting should be exciting, but it is more often anxiety-inducing, frustrating, and discouraging. If you’re having a hard time finding your next role, we want to help.

While it’s understandable to cast a wide net when applying for jobs, we want you to land a role that you actually want. And by tapping into your content marketing skills, you can greatly increase your likelihood of standing out from the pack.

In this #ContentChat recap, Andi Robinson, owner of Hijinx Marketing and author of The Content Puzzle, and the community discuss tactics for job hunting for content marketing or related roles. Read the full recap below to learn:

  • Tips for organizing your job search
  • Must-include (and remove!) resume elements
  • Proven ways to have a great interview

Erika and Andi discussed each of these questions on a LinkedIn Live audio conversation, and you can access the recording here. Please note that the recording starts partway into Q2—we appreciate your patience as we get the hang of our new dual-channel format.

Q1: When was the last time you were job hunting, and what was that experience like?

Several of our community members are currently job hunting or have been in recent months. If you know of open content marketing or related industry roles, please send them our way so we can include them in the Content Chat Bulletin email newsletter.

A1a: Now. I am job hunting as we speak. It has been an unusual experience. Every time a tech company announces layoffs, I cringe. Many people are looking for jobs right now. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

A1b: But there are many more remote jobs than pre-COVID, which opens up a lot more opportunities. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

A1: Um, right now unfortunately, due to a mass layoff. With this being the first time to be laid off, I’ve found it’s better to be able to yell to the world that I’m looking rather than searching covertly so my company doesn’t find out. #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

A1 about 2,5 years ago! Right in the middle of the pandemic! #ContentChat Strange times!

— Shruti Deshpande 🇮🇳🇬🇧 (@shruti12d) February 6, 2023

Q2: What challenges have you seen people face when looking for a job in recent months? If you are currently job hunting, what challenges are you facing?

Many companies are trying to understand their content and marketing needs, so content marketing job roles often involve a diverse (and overwhelming) mix of responsibilities. This can discourage candidates and is an understandable red flag when searching for roles.

A2a: In the content marketing space, I think companies are still trying to figure out what roles they need and how to fit them into their current structure. The diff. bw “content” and “content marketing” is also lost. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

And the difference between content, marketing, and strategy. All different things but many loop them together. #contentchat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

And public relations gets thrown into that mix, too. 🫣#ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) February 6, 2023

So true. AND copywriting #contentchat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

Candidates are often told they are “overqualified,” which can be code for “your salary requirements are too high.”

A2b: It has been 10 years since I have looked for a job, and my biggest challenge is being told I am overqualified. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

I have laughed at some of those canned replies when I know I’ve been highly qualified. I think sometimes it’s a case of budget mismatch. Nice that in CA they now have to post salary range.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) February 6, 2023

Yes! I definitely think that the interest rate increases are have a much more significant impact on budget these days.

After being at 0% for years, its going to take some time for companies to start spending again.#ContentChat

— Sweepsify 🎈 (@Sweepsify_) February 6, 2023

Luckily, some states now require companies to post a salary range for open roles.

A: Details on job salary disclosure: https:t.coa4g1kjJi39 #contentchat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

Same in Colorado! I swear I want to report every job listing I see that doesn’t include the salary. #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

Hiring technology that scans resumes to filter candidates add another hurdle in the process—how can you best structure a resume to be read by AI? More on that in Q4.

A2: The ATS is the devil. I’ve applied for jobs where I quite literally match every single requirement and skill, yet I’m told I’m not what they’re looking for. It’s like a video game boss I have to pass somehow. #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

Q3: How should a content marketer organize their job hunt? Any tips for how to structure their search, and favorite marketing job sites?

Create a list of must-haves to guide your search, and rank them in order of priority. Then, ask your network if they know of opportunities that fit your criteria.

A3a: Make a list of your requirements…what industries, locations, minimum requirements, and any “must-haves.” Tap your network right away and tell them what you are looking for. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

@hijinxmarketing on the must-haves, don’t forget to rank them! #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

LinkedIn is helpful for job searches, but there are several other options.

A3b: @LinkedIn is always a good bet for job searches, but there are several others out there. I have found the Otta job board to be good. Indeed has been a dud for me. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

Use a tool like ClickUp to organize potential jobs, and track all the roles (with job descriptions!) that you’ve applied for.

A3: I’ve been using ClickUp to organize my potential jobs. Also these job boards and communities:https:t.coBbM3n2j08Ehttps:t.coakQAWWSBSG
and Slack communities for tech workers #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

A3: I keep a document with all the JDs. I highlight key experience needed and outline questions to dive deeper into. I also keep a list of people in my network who are connected to the company or the HM. #contentchat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

Remember to take space from your job search when possible. Do things that you love so you can feel recharged throughout the process.

Great advice to remove yourself periodically from the job search for your own sanity. Do stuff you love, do stuff that’s fun, and refresh your soul. #contentchat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

Yes, make sure that you have an unrelated win every day to help you stay motivated. 🌠#ContentChat

— Sweepsify 🎈 (@Sweepsify_) February 6, 2023

Q4: What are the must-include elements of a standout content marketing resume?

The community shares several tips below to help you strengthen your resume. For starters, you can consider adding a short summary that states your case and includes keywords from the job description.

A4a: A short summary that states your case. It should be up-front to catch the recruiter’s eye. Keywords that match the specific job description. Specific results. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

Limit your resume to two pages (one page if possible) and customize it for each opportunity. Cut out unnecessary information like references and extensive education details.

A4b: What’s out? Fancy formatting, more than 2 pages, the same resume for every job, dates of education, references. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

I have a 2-pager version of my resume in PDF, but I also have a longer one in Word format because after 15 years in marketing, two pages is not going to cut it. I mention at the top “15 Years of Marketing Experience”. #contentchat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

Name specific skills and software you’ve used. Link to examples of your work.

A4: Skills, software, and a portfolio – preferably available via a link, though I have had application forms ask me to upload a portfolio document. #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

A4: I would include “skills” section on your resume. You can then alter that section to help keywords for a particular job. Work the machine don’t let the machine work you. #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

I’ve seen people list their skills with a 1-5 scale of how proficient they are, which I like. It’s usually in a visual way (five bubbles with a few circled in), but that can trip up the software that scans resumes. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) February 6, 2023

Your resume may be read—or discarded—by a computer before it is read by a human. Run your resume through a tool like Jobscan to see how AI will read your resume.

Yes. Depending on the company, the graphics won’t be read by their machine. ie larger companies, remove the fancy stuff. #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

Run your resume through @JobscanCo to check how your resume will be read by AI. #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

Ooh, thank you! I’m pretty sure my resume is not built well for scanners (I made it in Google Drawings lol), so this tool will be incredibly helpful. 🥰 #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) February 6, 2023

Include specific success metrics.

A4. Examples of your successes with metrics showcasing your experience and expertise is key! #ContentChat

— Shruti Deshpande 🇮🇳🇬🇧 (@shruti12d) February 6, 2023

Q5: How can content marketers use their skills to make them a more attractive candidate?

Andi and Rachel share a few tips below. How do you use your content marketing skills to stand out? If you’re comfortable sharing your secrets, tell us on Twitter or LinkedIn using #ContentChat.

A5a: Think of your resume as marketing collateral. You are marketing yourself. And your network is WOM marketing. You want people talking about you. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

A5b: Use more than one channel. You can’t just rely on your applications. Post on LinkedIn about topics that will make recruiters pay attention. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

A5: Treat your job search like it’s own campaign (cough, cough, #RachelForHire). Put out top of funnel content, cultivate folks through to middle of funnel (interviews), and then bottom of funnel where you’re getting an offer. #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

Q6: What tips can you share about interviewing for content marketing roles?

Be authentic in your job interview, and take time before answering a question to collect your thoughts.

A6: I am a big fan of being authentic in job interviews. Make sure you have your key points in mind (or in view if you are meeting virtually). Take your time getting your thoughts together when answering. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) February 6, 2023

Have stories ready: Tell us about a project that didn’t go as planned. What about a project that exceeded expectations—what led to its success? When did you last face a serious challenge in your work, and how did you overcome it?

A6: Have stories ready. Not just receipts of your work, but tell the story about how you got to that result. This has been something I’ve had to learn in the last several months. #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

Bring up salary early on in the process, but ask them to disclose their range before you offer yours.

I bring up salary in the first phone screen; no need to waste everyone’s time if they aren’t close to my required range. #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

With salary – ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS ask them to disclose their rang before you offer yours. #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

rank…not rang #contentchat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

I love how direct this is. Many candidates think they should go through the full interview first to “justify” their salary. But most employers already know how much they willwon’t spend, so you might as well save everyone’s time. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) February 6, 2023

Yep. Ain’t nobody got time for that, and when everyone on the call knows that time = money, let’s not waste it for anyone. #contentchat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

If a hiring manager sees your personal branding as a threat rather than an asset, then it is likely not a good opportunity for you.

Preach @ErikaHeald – any brand or manager who sees your personal branding as a threat rather than an asset need to punch sand. #contentchat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

There can be many interview stages with a single company, potentially including homework. Erika and Andi discuss this in the audio recap above, and the community shares their thoughts below:

Can we talk about how many interview rounds there are these days and how ridiculous it is? Six, seven, eight rounds AND a presentation? What are we doing?#ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

I think that depends on the experience. High experience, more interviews. I now ask for interviews with people who are NOT on the plan – remember you interview them as much as they interview you. #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

#ContentChat re: not getting paid for interview homework pic.twitter.comHsxyH6qbxZ

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

As a hiring manager, I always ask for some homework with a time limit. The goal is NEVER about the work, but how they get the work done. And their work is NEVER used. #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

I once had two assignments to do … and that was before I even met with the hiring manager! The company was clearly trying to weed people out. But still … Ridiculous. #contentchat

— Martin Lieberman (@martinlieberman) February 6, 2023

WHEN the assignment is done is key. I usually ask it before or for the final round of interviews. #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

Right. That’s legit. This company was asking me to do work that I clearly had done before based on my past job experience. #contentchat

— Martin Lieberman (@martinlieberman) February 6, 2023

Totally agree.

I received 2 emails from a hiring manager. One said we could do an optional content strategy that would be due in 1 week. Unpaid.
The next email said, after receiving tons of feedback, they were removing that option.

This was before any 1st round. #contentchat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

This is a🚩 that they plan on wasting your time, definitely.#ContentChat

— Sweepsify 🎈 (@Sweepsify_) February 6, 2023

Yup. It was an in-demand company, and they were clearly trying to see who was serious about wanting to work there. Those who moved forward were suckers. Myself included. LOL #contentchat

— Martin Lieberman (@martinlieberman) February 6, 2023

LOL it was hilarious because after I got the first email I told my family and was mentally drafting my “uh thanks but no thanks” response.

Once I came back to write up my email, I saw their follow-up and saw that everyone else had taken care of it. #ContentChat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

Amy recommends you ask “Do you have any concerns about me for this position?”

Questions for job interview: Always ask “Do you have any concerns about me for this position?” – it gives you a chance to reply to anything you may of missed explaining #ContentChat

— Amy Higgins (@amywhiggins) February 6, 2023

And Erika recommends you ask a question directly related to Glassdoor reviews—it’s a bold move, but teams in a healthy culture will admit their flaws and give a transparent answer. People in toxic cultures may become angry that you asked such a question.

I am stealing that tactic for interview questions, @ErikaHeald! Glassdoor is a goldmine for companies to do better and be better. #contentchat

— Rachel Moore Cowbell (@RachelHasTheMic) February 6, 2023

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