February 15, 2021 Content Chat Recap: How to Use Video for Personal Branding

A #ContentChat header image that says today's topic is how to use video for personal branding, with guest Christine Gritmon.

When it comes to personal branding, what do you prioritize? People usually focus on their biographies or “about” sections, keywords, blog posts, social media copy, and other written forms of communication that showcase who they are and their skillset.

These areas are essential pieces of a complete personal brand, but even the best writing can still leave audiences wanting a better gauge of who you are and why they should trust you. One of the most effective ways to literally show and tell what you’re about is with video content, and there are plenty of ways to use video for personal branding.

In this #ContentChat, we’re joined by personal branding coach and social media trainer Christine Gritmon to discuss how to create more engaging personal branding with video. Read the full recap below, where we discuss what equipment is needed to create video content, the channels that are most valuable for sharing your videos, and pitfalls to avoid.

Q1: Why should video be part of a marketer’s personal branding strategy?

Video content engages more senses, which is more effective for establishing a sense of connection.

A1a.
Nothing connects with people as well as video.
Humans are hard-wired to respond to moving objects, eye contact, and the experience of being in close physical proximity, which video replicates. >>#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A1b.
Video also stimulates more senses:
We can SEE and HEAR at the same time.
This taps into a greater audience connection.⁰#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A1: Video reduces the amount of noise in the channel by engaging more senses. Not only should it be part of a personal branding strategy, but part of most brands promotion. #contentchat

— John Cloonan (@johncloonan) February 15, 2021

Video shows a human side of you and your brand that written content simply cannot (or not as effectively).

A1: I like how video brings a more personal connection to your brand. It puts a face, voice and personality to your name, which can help more people connect with you. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) February 15, 2021

A1: Video shows the human side of you and your brand. Great way to show personality and to also help build trust! #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger #Digital360Chat (@B2the7) February 15, 2021

A1
Video is a tool for storytelling and connection. It gives life to a brand if done well #contentchat https://t.co/L5jk8qly33

— Olivia Griffin (@LivGrMedia) February 15, 2021

And remember that video content can be simple. There is a place for well-produced video, but a quick video can be just as effective, especially for personal branding.

A1: As nice as it is to hear from everyone, it’s also nice to see people and connect a face to the message.

And video doesn’t have to be hard or overly produced! #ContentChat

— Kaitlyn Arford — Freelance Writer (@kaitarford) February 15, 2021

I’d argue it’s even better if it’s not overly produced. Keeps on the same level. #ContentChat

— Shane Shaps (@520eastbrands) February 15, 2021

That’s a great point about not having to be overly produced! It’s something I stress to clients all the time! I think there is still a perception that video should be a formal production. #ContentChat

— Jonna Howe (@JonnaHowe) February 15, 2021

A1: Video really started picking up in 2017 as the thing to keep an eye on for marketers and it hasn’t let up since.

Making quality quick videos from your smartphone is essential to marketing success on social. #ContentChat https://t.co/0HFiDgAFw2

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

Q2: What equipment or software do you recommend for marketers looking to implement video branding strategies?

A smartphone and good lighting is all you need to get started with video content. Too often, people worry about creating video with a high production value. Instead, focus on the quality of the discussion and refine the presentation as you get more confident with video.

A2: I don’t do video (a goal of mine this year is to get comfortable on camera) but I think just filming with your phone is enough. Instagram stories are a really low-stakes platform to connect with people on camera – short snippets, naturally produced.#ContentChat

— Kaitlyn Arford — Freelance Writer (@kaitarford) February 15, 2021

Yes! I tell people: just record it straight-up, don’t watch it, and upload it then and there. Overthinking (& multiple takes) is where people get stuck!#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

And we are so much more critical of ourselves than anyone else will be in almost all cases. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Expert (@SFerika) February 15, 2021

Yup. The audience is ROOTING for things to go well; nobody wants to waste their time watching something that sucks! So if you stumble, they’ll be rooting for you to get back on your feet. They WANT you to succeed!#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

I started livestreaming last month! Learning my way but definitely have not invested a lot up front… it’s been fun so far. Every week I screw something up and learn something new! #ContentChat

— Shane Shaps (@520eastbrands) February 15, 2021

And these are my first 7 episodes! https://t.co/N5NrsTrZRh #ContentChat

— Shane Shaps (@520eastbrands) February 15, 2021

So true!
Mess-ups give you an opportunity to show how you handle things. It’s a far better view of who you are than when everything’s going perfectly.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

An external microphone will provide better sound quality. Christine, Melanie, and Erika recommend some options below.

A2a.
Truly, all you need is a smartphone and natural light from a window!
But my setup currently includes a DSLR camera connected to my computer via CamLink, a ring light, two umbrella lights & a UBS mic (Blue Yeti). >>#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A2: I think you can keep it simple (at least at the start) — you don’t need to spend tons of $$! A decent smartphone or laptop camera and good lighting should be enough. Sound, though, is key. I try to use a headset or a Blue Yeti mic. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) February 15, 2021

A2: I do a lot of live video with clients and for webinars, etc., and mostly use my iMac’s built-in camera. It’s perfect for most things I do. I have a Shure USB microphone, however, for better sound quality. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Expert (@SFerika) February 15, 2021

I really love it. I actually sound like *me* when I hear playback! https://t.co/ngriXpdUac #ContentCaht

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Expert (@SFerika) February 15, 2021

Eventually, you can introduce advanced lighting and filming options to boost your production value.

A2: It comes down to your budget. IF you can do it – lapel mics, multiple lighting sources, a professional camera.

BUT, I do just fine with an iPhone and a ring light. I do have an external mic I can use (great for outdoor content with wind). #ContentChat https://t.co/6Prfs57Nig

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

The community shares their favorite software for video creation below. Did we miss yours? Let us know in the comments.

A2b.
For live video, programs like @ecammtweets @streamyardapp @Restreamio allow you to do things like pre-scheduled livestream links, overlays, guests, etc. >>#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A2c.
For prerecorded video, you can do basic editing with the free version of iMovie or paid programs like @AdobeSpark
Add text & overlays with @wave_video or even @canva #ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A2: I also use @openshot for editing (free!) #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) February 15, 2021

A2: Going to give the low tech that I use…a phone, headphones or ear buds, iMovie and photoshop. For LiveStreaming, I have been using StreamYard and my monitor. As I get more into it, I will look to upgrade but for just getting started, these work. #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger #Digital360Chat (@B2the7) February 15, 2021

A2 Honestly you can get away with filming on a smart phone, the cameras on those things are so good now!
I would suggest getting a video editing software – I’m partial to premier because that’s what I learned on and know best
-Alyx #contentchat https://t.co/L4tyhNsQdo

— Charlie Appel Agency (@ColfaxInsurance) February 15, 2021

Speaking of Streaming, I have found @Streamyard to be a great resource to make live video broadcasts easier to manage. What do you use? #ContentChat

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

I’ll also throw @KapwingApp out there for editing/resizing. I’ve used that a bunch! #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) February 15, 2021

Repurpose your video content as a GIF using GIPHY. Christine shares instructions below.

What software do you use to create your animated GIFs? #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Expert (@SFerika) February 15, 2021

I use @GIPHY ! I also pre-edit clips of mine on Final Cut Pro, since it’s what I have, but it’s not necessary.

How I do it:https://t.co/1o9DK00g3z

The easier way on your phone:https://t.co/zV7fpKjy7B#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

Best use of @GIPHY is @cgritmon and @MadalynSklar 😂

That reminds me – I need new ones. Loving this chat. Just catching up and definitely getting some great insights and tips #contentchat

— Gail Robertson-ChiefCuriosityOfficer (@GailNow) February 15, 2021

Q3: What channels are most valuable for sharing video content? Is there an optimal length for videos on various platforms?

At a high level: Short-form video performs best on TikTok and Instagram (Stories and Reels). Long-form video and pre-recorded content is well suited for YouTube. Live video can work with Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram Live.

A3a.
Depends on the kind of video you’re creating.
Trendy, fast-moving short form is great for TikTok/IG Reels/even IG Stories.
Live video is good for FB/YouTube/IG (save IG Lives as IGTV replays!);
Periscope is closing but I hope it will make Twitter Live better.>>#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A3b.
Prerecorded how-tos are great for YouTube; being a destination to answer questions. YT is also best for longform.
Not enough people are using video on LinkedIn or Twitter so it’s a great way to stand out.
And of course for Twitter I love GIFs!#ContentChat pic.twitter.com/YTL0kwrVxh

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A3: I know TikTok is big, but I only spend time on Twitter and Instagram. I think Instagram stories are great for sharing video, and gifs are great on Twitter!#ContentChat

— Kaitlyn Arford — Freelance Writer (@kaitarford) February 15, 2021

A3. We’ve found native video does really well on Facebook in terms of vies and engagement, but once we start adding external links in starts to decrease. Instagram Reels and IG tv also perform really well. #ContentChat

— WebEnertia B2B Marketing (@WebEnertia) February 15, 2021

People are still exploring LinkedIn for video, and it is less common to see video on the site. This means there is an opportunity to stand out on the channel by using video.

A4: Facebook and IG are my favorite places to share videos. I’m still trying to determine what kind of video content would work best on LinkedIn, though @NeoLuxeMo and I had some video Content Chats that had solid engagement. #ContentChat https://t.co/K4DMxxYRKx

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Expert (@SFerika) February 15, 2021

A3: I’ve found a lot of success with video (+live video) on FB. More success than any other post type, really.

Also, I think people forget about video on LinkedIn, but it seems to be out-ranking other types of content on there.

Also love YouTube for live video. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) February 15, 2021

A3: I have been using video on LinkedIn, FB, IG and even Pinterest and seeing some good engagement and success. Longer Videos on Twitter don’t seem to be as effective and shorter video and gifs. #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger #Digital360Chat (@B2the7) February 15, 2021

Twitch is valuable for streaming live videos.

A3 I like YouTube for prerecorded content, they also have an option for streaming
Twitch and FB have pretty good streaming/live options as well
The length of the video depends on the content that you’re creating – there’s no magic number
-Alyx #contentchat https://t.co/pbHmcTaPke

— Charlie Appel Agency (@ColfaxInsurance) February 15, 2021

Is Twitter a good platform for video content? Christine says that video replies are great for engagement. She has also experimented with hosting a video chat alongside her #ChatAboutBrand Twitter chat.

Question for this question: Should video be a thing on Twitter? I’ve seen some and even seen people respond with videos in Twitter chats (which I don’t get at all). We have Fleets now, but overall, should Twitter be part of a video strategy? #ContentChat

— Jennifer L. Dawson (@JLDContentQueen) February 15, 2021

I did a simultaneous Twitter chat & livestream where I timed it really carefully so my guest and I were discussing the same question as it went live to the chat… doing it again in March!#ContentChat #ChatAboutBrand

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

Video replies are GREAT for engagement, especially since hardly anyone uses them! My friend @MLLNNLmotivator has done a lot with this strategy.
I don’t do it because I honestly don’t usually watch video replies… I feel it breaks up the flow… but it works for Dan!#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

And JMatt adds considerations for video orientation. Vertical/portrait is best for Instagram Stories and TikTok. Horizontal/landscape is best on YouTube and Twitch.

A3: It all varies by platform. Just as video orientation varies.

Vertical is great for Stories and TikTok/Reels.

Horizontal is still favored by YouTube (and Twitch).

Longer videos is great for YT (and FB). Short is good for TikTok, Stories, Reels. #ContentChat https://t.co/eiVY4VlSet

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

Q4: How can we use video to reinforce our branding? What are some foundational areas to cover or address?

Provide value to your community in your videos. Give tips, tricks, and expertise that prove you are an expert on the topic. Video is a great way to show who you are and build trust in your community.

A4a.
No part of your branding is as unique or recognizable as your own face. It can really help you establish that “know/like/trust” factor. >>#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A4b.
Establish your topic of expertise and offer VALUE on that topic over and over.
Don’t fear “giving it away.”
You’ll get trust and audience relationships in return. >>#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

Love the point about not being afraid to give away your secrets! It’s so important for building a trustworthy brand. #ContentChat https://t.co/XfglbAmJ6q

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) February 15, 2021

A4: I like video for establishing trust and personality. You are not hiding behind a keyboard. I really learned the power of this from @MLLNNLmotivator and how he used video to engage but to also show who he is. #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger #Digital360Chat (@B2the7) February 15, 2021

Open and close videos in a consistent way to reinforce your branding and show that you will continue to create content on your topic of interest.

A4c.
Try to open and close your videos in a consistent way if they’re part of a series, and encourage people to come back next time.
If you can show up consistently (and thus promo your next video in your previous one), so much the better.#ContentChat
>>

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A4d.
Above all, recognize that your audience’s attention is precious.
Make them grateful that they gave it to you.
Make them want to give it to you again.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

Brands can use video to spotlight employees, customer stories, and showcase the brand’s values.

A4. Being a B2B brand we use video to highlight our core values and work! Often times it is also featuring our employees. We do all of this to build trust with our followers and customers! #ContentChat

— WebEnertia B2B Marketing (@WebEnertia) February 15, 2021

That’s a good one. Same here we are B2B as well and we tell customer stories through video. Helps prospects truly understand the value we bring #contentchat

— Shruti Deshpande (@shruti12d) February 15, 2021

A4: Both my personal and professional brands are centered around connecting with people, so I would use video to share insights, answer questions, and show a little bit more about what goes into the work I do 🌿 #ContentChat

— Olivia Griffin (@LivGrMedia) February 15, 2021

Video creates visibility for your on-screen presence. Brands can use different spokespeople for relevant topics to build out their individual thought leadership platforms and build trust in the community.

A4: I have worked at two orgs that we leverage the President/CEO in video – make the top-level person visible not just to staff but to people that support our org.

Company updates/changes/announcements come from that person in a video to our social media channels. #ContentChat https://t.co/ooBQ0l9Pi2

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

Q5: What should individuals know about @Instagram’s IGTV?

IGTV videos get 4x the potential reach than a regular video post, and your videos must be between one and fifteen minutes long.

A5: I saw a report recently that suggested IGTV videos get 4x the potential reach than a regular video post. Videos must be between 1-15 minutes long.

IG plays a portion in the feed and you have to click to watch the rest, make sure to time out your hook. #ContentChat https://t.co/K7zUjsTDEi

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

You can repurpose your video content a few ways for Instagram. Turn an IG Live into an IGTV video. Post videos to your story and feed, and then add a highlight to your page of past videos.

A5a.
A lot of people don’t realize you can turn an IG Live into an IGTV video! Do feed & story posts before the live, then after your live is over, save it as an IGTV & put previews of that IGTV on feed & stories. You can then put that story in a highlight! >>#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A5c.
You can also organize your IGTV videos as series. One good way to drive people to those is to do story previews of your IGTV videos, then organize those stories in Highlights for each series to keep driving traffic to the IGTV videos.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A5: I have been posting my longer videos on IGTV and having some good success but it also gives you the ability to post that longer form video…and then you can do a story on IG to push peeps to watch. #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger #Digital360Chat (@B2the7) February 15, 2021

IGTV allows you to put a live link in the caption.

A5b.
Another untapped IGTV resource: you can put a LIVE LINK in the caption! It’s the only place besides your bio you can put a real link. The link won’t work in your feed post preview but it works on the IGTV itself.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

Experiment with the platform to get used to its interface and features. Watch IGTV content from other users to get an idea of what is possible.

A5 Do some trial runs if possible, get the feel of the function before launching a ‘for real’ episode or show
Do some research, reach out to those that regularly use IGTV and get their feedback and tips and tricks for using it better
-Alyx #contentchat https://t.co/B3sAUR7Z3U

— Charlie Appel Agency (@ColfaxInsurance) February 15, 2021

No matter what, focus on the value for your viewers.

A5: I don’t film Insta videos, but as someone who watches Instagram IGTV, I think it’s good to stay on topic and more concise if you’re creating videos in that environment. If your video is rambling with no point, I’m gonna stop watching.#ContentChat

— Kaitlyn Arford — Freelance Writer (@kaitarford) February 15, 2021

Q6: How should marketers approach accessibility with their video content?

Captions are a must for video content. Many people watch videos on mute, so they need a way to consume your video content without audio.

A6.
Captions are a must. Make sure people can experience your video without sound.
On the flip side, it’s great if your video can be interesting sound-wise, without visuals.
BOTH is the ideal.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A6: Captions are so important. It takes time, but if spoken audio is a focal part to the video, you need to make it easy to access.

Much of video content on social is consumed on mute – let people watch silently while they’re at *cough* work *cough*. #ContentChat https://t.co/l4RTtYyhbT

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

A6: Caption everything! Lots of people watch video on silent, in addition to people who require accessibility.#ContentChat

— Kaitlyn Arford — Freelance Writer (@kaitarford) February 15, 2021

Some very interesting facts here about video consumption on mute….so important to get this right. Thanks for bringing this up!! #contentchat https://t.co/BsLyitdrMp

— Shruti Deshpande (@shruti12d) February 15, 2021

Auto-generated captions often have errors. Confirm that they are accurate before you publish.

A note on this – auto-generated captions are nowhere near good enough. Make sure to check them and correct them. #ContentChat

— John Cloonan (@johncloonan) February 15, 2021

A6 Captions and alt text!!
I learned a trick from another chat was to publish to private with auto captions on, then edit them and publish to public – this is for YT, don’t know if it works for other platforms as well
-Alyx #contentchat https://t.co/x4vMjUGDDV

— Charlie Appel Agency (@ColfaxInsurance) February 15, 2021

A6: Captions, for sure! And try to make them dramatically correct (or close to correct) when possible. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) February 15, 2021

Some platforms have built-in features for captioning. Or, you can use captioning services like Quicc.

A6b.
I will admit that I’m bad with this… but @quiccvideo is a GREAT captioning service. They’re very accurate, let you control how your captions look (fonts/colors/placements/sizes), and you can also download the SRT file to upload to various platforms.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A6.b: The app that a lot of TikTokers use is “Captions for TikTok” – which is specific to vertical videos. I haven’t personally used it, but know a lot of people enjoy it. #ContentChat

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

Consider including a text transcript of your video as well. It will boost your SEO and further improve the accessibility of your video content.

A6: Any pre-recorded video should have captioning, if possible, or a text transcript that accompanies it. In addition to it making your content more accessible, it will also boost your SEO when embedded on your website. #ContentChat https://t.co/naLiECcM0B

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Expert (@SFerika) February 15, 2021

Be mindful of how you design your video experience based on where captions are included. Some platforms have buttons that overlay on the video, which could hide your logos or text.

A6.c: When adding captions, be mindful of where the video is being posted – TikTok for example has text at the bottom for the caption and buttons on the screen that overlay – you’ll want to avoid those areas so people can read the captions. #ContentChat

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

I personally always try to be aware of where I place titles and logos for FB and YT – knowing that the captions are loaded as an option, not on the actual video. I don’t want a person’s title covered by captions. #ContentChat

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

When designing my live stream show’s overlay, I actively considered caption placement as part of the design… aaaaand I haven’t had the time or bandwidth to actually add them in a while. Will get back on it soon! But it’s been planned for. ❤️ #ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

For more accessibility info, Christine recommends that you follow @HashtagHeyAlexa.

A6c.
A great source for accessibility info in general, btw, is @HashtagHeyAlexa — she’s all about best practices for social media accessibility!#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

Q7: What are the pros and cons of live-streamed video versus pre-recorded?

Live video can build a more genuine connection with your audience because it happens in real time. There is a potential for errors, but people are generally forgiving of these in live video.

A7a.
I love live because you do it and it’s done! Even if I do a pre-recorded video, I don’t like to do a ton of editing. I like it raw and real; I also feel it connects better with the audience, since they’re seeing me somewhat unfiltered & I can interact with them.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A7: Once you start, there is no stopping – errors and all!!! @520eastbrands is an excellent host who has a great show – she is so fluid, preparred and has a nice flow to her show. #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger #Digital360Chat (@B2the7) February 15, 2021

A7: Live stream has all the problems of live anything – stuff can go wrong, and it will. It’s unfiltered, unpolished, and dependent on auto-captions.

On the upside, it’s live and real-time. #ContentChat

— John Cloonan (@johncloonan) February 15, 2021

Lots of room for error in a live stream – batteries could die, internet could drop out, etc, but the audience can engage in real-time. Prerecord can have higher production value.

— Roland Kay-Smith (@rolandkaysmith) February 15, 2021

Pre-recorded videos allow for a more polished presentation and higher production value.

A7b.
The advantages of pre-recorded are largely that you can do higher production value and you can make sure it’s all super smooth, no umm or ah.⁰
You can also take clips from live videos and spin them out into short, snackable bites.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

A7: When it’s live, people forgive ‘mistakes’ more easily. You’re able to engage in real-time with your audience.

Pre-Recorded has an expectation that the video is a little more polished and edited (depending on the platform). #ContentChat https://t.co/A1mNDLLpH8

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

Q8: What pitfalls should individuals avoid with their video content?

The biggest pitfall to avoid is not experimenting with video content. It may feel uncomfortable at first, but you will gain confidence the more you practice.

A8.
AVOIDING IT!⁰
Seriously, if you’re camera-shy, do Point-of-View videos (or, better yet, get over it and just do it!).
Put it out there. If it’s bad, you can always take it down.#ContentChat pic.twitter.com/e0dUO8uo42

— Christine Gritmon #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) February 15, 2021

Haha YES!

I’d add that the more video you do, the more comfortable you will be about being on video, and the better your videos will be. It’s a virtuous cycle! #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Expert (@SFerika) February 15, 2021

Be wary of your surroundings, including any music or potentially copyrighted materials that could get your video taken down.

A8: As @iSocialFanz always says…Just press the damn button. Watch your supproundings, watch copyrighed songs and material. #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger #Digital360Chat (@B2the7) February 15, 2021

Use natural lighting when possible, and safeguard against audio distortion by using wind guards for mics if you’re outside.

A8: Two essentials you can’t overlook: Lighting and Sound Quality.

Overhead lights are not the move – natural light or in front of the subject as much as possible.

Sound – avoid music (copyright issues) and WIND (wind guards for mics or move inside). #ContentChat https://t.co/30Aahyqr1v

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

BTW, there’s no shame in having a windsock on your mic indoors. It can keep down some of the ambients from heater fans and such. #contentchat

— John Cloonan (@johncloonan) February 15, 2021

That’s a fair point too! When I move inside, I’d want a lapel mic (not that I have one) – but that would be my recommendation there. #ContentChat

— JMatt (@JMattMke) February 15, 2021

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