August 2, 2021 Content Chat Recap: How To Build A Thriving Multi-Platform Community Around Your Content

A #ContentChat header image that says today's chat topic is how to build a thriving multi-platform community around your content, with guest Neil Parekh.

How can marketers best engage and delight their community online? And how should this strategy change if the community spans multiple social media channels?

In this #ContentChat, we’re joined by Neil Parekh, VP of events and communications for Digimentors, to discuss how to build a thriving multi-platform community around your content. Neil shares lessons from his work on the #NYTReadalong as he and the community explain how to build an engaged community on Twitter and Facebook, plus ways to use email marketing, live video, and more to nurture your relationships.

Q1: What common mistakes do you see brands or individuals make when trying to build a multi-platform community? How can we avoid these mistakes?

Deliver tailored content on each of your social media channels. Do not simply copy/paste the same content at the same time across channels. There are two reasons for this. 1.) Each of your social media communities is unique, and you should approach them as such. 2.) Each channel has exclusive settings or features that you should explore, and common features like hashtags may perform differently based on the channel.

A1a. Common mistake when building a multi-platform community: Automatic cross-posting & copy/pasting between FB/TW/LI/IG. Handles and image sizes are different, use of hashtags are different, character count and audience is different. #ContentChathttps://t.co/976OIPkc1O pic.twitter.com/8FsqlyJWgZ

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A1b. Avoid multi-platform mistakes.
Create standard text first & modify for each channel.
Use the @SproutSocial image guide. (Note, 1920×1080 works great on FB, TW and LI.)
Check your handles. Use fewer hashtags if not on IG.#ContentChathttps://t.co/LNFzIuAQg3

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A1.
Not giving people specific reasons to engage with them on each platform!
If all the content is the same everywhere, why should they follow you in different places? ❤️ #ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

A1. A very common mistake I see brands/ppl make when creating multi-platform communities is copy pasting the same content (without even tweaking it to meet the platform’s requirements) across all channels. It’s honestly boring and does little to garner engagement. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

Start with just one or two channels where your audience is already engaged. Do not launch a full multi-platform strategy if you are just getting started. It will take a considerable amount of resources to launch and maintain any individual channel. Put your full effort into the places you know you can make an impact, instead of trying to be everywhere to little effect.

A1: One of the biggest mistakes I see is launching a channel without the resources or content to keep it up. Then the channel goes dormant…and that doesn’t look good for a brand. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 2, 2021

A1. Common mistakes
🙈 Same #content on every platform instead of using the specifics + advantages of each one
🙈 Not checking the audience on a platform before starting
🙈 Just being on a plaform for no reason or real connection just because you “have to be there”#ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 2, 2021

A1
When an individual or small company is just getting started, know what platform your biggest audience is likely to be engaged on. Yes, it’s great to be on multi-platforms but it’s hard to post on all platforms w/ the same energy at the start.
Focus!#contentchat pic.twitter.com/uz2PbArFZ5

— Rose Horowitz, #WomentoFollow, #SreeShow (@RoseHorowitz31) August 2, 2021

Also: look at what’s actually working and what people are truly responding to!
I wasted years trying to make Facebook my top platform.
Once I gave in and acknowledged/owned/embraced that Twitter was my top by far, everything got bigger and better!#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

That’s true. Organic reach on Facebook has tanked. Particularly for livestreams. We used to get huge audiences for the #NYTReadalong on FB Live. We get more engagement there, but more numbers on Twitter. #ContentChat.

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

If you claim handles and usernames/create accounts on channels that you cannot invest in yet, pin a post to the top of that page to explain where your brand is currently active.

I see this a TON when I do social media channel audits for new clients. If you are just claiming your brand name, at least pin a post to the top of the page to direct them to where your brand IS active! #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

THIS.
I had a client who absolutely did not want to deal with Facebook at all… but it made sense to be there for her industry.
So we made her profile super strong & then did everything we could to direct people to her website, her IG, and/or call/email. ❤️ #ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

Create and share content that aligns with your brand mission and audience needs. Do not create and share content to jump on a bandwagon or trending topic. It can be tempting to join the “What’s happening” conversations on Twitter, but it can come across as inauthentic or, at worst, offensive and alienating to your community if your brand joins conversations for the sake of being relevant.

A1. Jumping on the “trends” bandwagon to grab eyeballs without any relevance to their core brand or purpose #contentchat

— Mahima Kini (@Mahi2weets) August 2, 2021

Q2: How can marketers build a thriving community on Twitter? What are your lesser-known tips and tricks?

Neil recommends using non-Twitter channels including DM groups, WhatsApp, email, and (potentially) other social channels to encourage people to join the conversation on Twitter.

A2a. DM Groups, WhatsApp, Emails & Newsletters are all great when building a thriving community on Twitter. The key is that these are all off-Twitter. Encourage people to share content in the group with the idea that everyone will amplify.#ContentChathttps://t.co/HHvW4kUSCf pic.twitter.com/Yl9SG9ga43

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A2b. @sree is a master at using DM groups and WhatsApp. I used both to help get more engagement on my #ContentChat promo tweet.https://t.co/rgINhj2RAH

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

Actively join conversations about topics of relevance to your community, and invest in the individuals that make up your community.

A2.
Add value to conversations that are already happening to build your reach, then start valuable conversations once you have a community.
Chats like #ContentChat are great places to find like-minded communities, as are conferences (that conference hashtag can be GOLD!). ❤️

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

This is really important, Christine. Twitter is a place where conversations happen. If your feed is just an endless series of you promoting your brand, you are missing out on the core element that makes Twitter stand out from the other platforms. #ContentChat https://t.co/DSTQrwIeDx

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

A2 Focus on relationships and community
Sales are important, but relationships are what last
Show that you’re available, active, and consistent on your platform and you’ll be top of mind when you’re most needed
-Alyx #ContentChat https://t.co/gAmFXqZypX

— Charlie & Alyx – Charlie Appel Agency (@ColfaxInsurance) August 2, 2021

Use Twitter Lists to narrow your feed and focus on specific groups or personas within a channel.

A2a.
LISTS are such a great and under-utilized Twitter feature. They can help you narrow down who you want to pay the most attention to at any given time for a given reason so you can be sure to nurture those relationships.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

I am such a huge fan of Twitter lists! Even more so now that I can connect to my Twitter lists and use them in @feedly. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

With you on this, Christine. 💯 Lists are an awesome way to engage with different segments of your target audience including connecting with your peers on a regular note. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

A2-Twitter Lists. I’m a big fan of both public and private Twitter lists. Helps filter out the noise so you can look for specific types of content and people get a notification when they’re added. #WomentoFollow by @RoseHorowitz31 and @heykiddo is a great example. #ContentChat

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A2: When #WomenToFollow started trending my friend @heykiddo started a Twitter list. It is now more than 1,800 names strong.

Here’s the link: https://t.co/lMUKckIomm

Thanks for the shout out @neilparekh
cc: @sree @SpinItSocial #contentchat

— Rose Horowitz, #WomentoFollow, #SreeShow (@RoseHorowitz31) August 2, 2021

And if you’re hosting a conference, create a Twitter list of all the speakers so that your attendees can easily connect with them.

I’ve seen a conference create a Twitter list of all their speakers, so all people have to do is follow it — brilliant! ❤️ #ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

Still I amazed how many conferences do not feature the Twitter handles of their speakers in the agenda or speaker list. Would boost their possibilities in reach + I don’t have to research them 😁#ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 2, 2021

Speaking of conferences, use conference hashtags to live-tweet the event and connect with other attendees.

Conference hashtags – yes! They’re a great opportunity to build relationships with folks who are new to the platform/industry/your brand. And don’t just automate content during a conference, get on and engage! It’s a great way to spread your reach. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 2, 2021

A3. Live tweeting a good event has served me well in terms of connections and influence – I guess that and use of visual media helps #contentchat

— Mahima Kini (@Mahi2weets) August 2, 2021

Absolutely. Conference hashtags are a must.

If you’re organizing a conference, make sure the hashtag is short, easy to remember and unique. Three lessons from @Sree about hashtags.#ContentChat

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

My friend @StonehamPress gave me the BRILLIANT tip of programming in a keyboard shortcut for the conference hashtag (beginning it with “x” is especially smart, so you don’t type it by accident).
I also pre-load the speaker handles (plus hashtag) on a Notes doc.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

Now I’d use a tool like PhraseExpress or TextExpander to store all the speaker handles as well. Not had a chance to try it out at a live conference yet. #contentchat

— Tim Lewis @Stoneham Press #indieAuthorChat (@StonehamPress) August 2, 2021

I did the @Evernote list of speaker handles hack myself previously to make sure I tagged the right folks at events I liveTweeted.

I haven’t used those PhraseExpress or TextExpander before. Tell me more! #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

Forced me to finally set up a YouTube video for the training site 🙂
Here’s the video introduction:https://t.co/BX8pe3e6H3#ContentChat

— Tim Lewis @Stoneham Press #indieAuthorChat (@StonehamPress) August 2, 2021

Hashtags nerd here. Others do @TEDTalks about ending hunger and saving the world. I did a @TedxPoynter talk in 2012 about hashtags.🤦‍♂️ Since then, they’ve become even more important. https://t.co/pdTiPkwwbg

[Thanks, @ellynkamke & @poynter team for inviting me!] #contentchat

— Sree Sreenivasan (@sree) August 2, 2021

A persistent conference hashtag can help strengthen your community.

I’m also a fan of conferences that have a persistent hashtag that lives on throughout the year and doesn’t change with each event. Makes it so much easier to build that community over the long term. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

Use tools like Chirpty to understand who you most often engage with on Twitter (and should probably connect with them across channels).

A2c.@chirpty_team is a fun way to monitor who you’ve been interacting with the most on Twitter (based on your last thousand or so interactions)—I like to look at those lists as a starting point to ensure I’m connecting with those people on other platforms as well!#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

Join (or host!) a Twitter Chat to connect with other pros interested in similar topics. If you plan to start a new Twitter Chat, though, ensure you have an engaged following that is interested in joining a new Twitter Chat. Without an existing community, it will be much more difficult (if not impossible) to build that community.

A2c. Another great way to build a community on Twitter? Host a #TwitterChat.

I ran the award-winning, often-trending #UnitedWayChat for @UnitedWay. Learned a lot from @MadalynSklar / #TwitterSmarter and wrote a how-to blog post for @kanter.https://t.co/AblA8zN2TZ#ContentChat pic.twitter.com/efRrW1p6CT

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A2. Identify your target audience. Be crystal clear about your target then join Twitter chats to engage with those people.

Slowly, build your relationships with them outside the chat and then start your own Twitter chats to continue nurturing those target folks. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

P.S. I should mention here that waking up one day to create a Twitter chat, expecting people to join you isn’t going to work. In fact, that’s only going to give you a flop chat that you’ll need to shut down after some time.

So: engage first, create a chat 2nd. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

Christian reinforces the main ways to be successful on Twitter: Engage with your community, help them overcome their challenges, start conversations, and be authentic.

A2. Not sure if there is a hidden trick but
✔ Meaningful engagement
✔ Helpful post + threads
✔ Answering questions, helping out + be in friendly conversations in your key topics.
✔ Start conversations, use @ mentions + # wisely
✔ Be yourself, not your selfie. #ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 2, 2021

Although Karl’s approach can work well, too, depending on your brand.

Know wisely when to

– be kind.
✅ use bullet lists.
– piss off and offend everybody.

😀

— Karl Kratz (@karlkratz) August 2, 2021

Q3: Twitter threads have become increasingly popular and shareable. How should content marketers create and structure threads to drive engagement?

Neil creates insanely popular Twitter threads for the #NYTReadalong. He recommends you number your tweets, serve a different purpose in each tweet, use images and tag up to 10 accounts, and use retweet with comment to maximize your results.

A3a. Twitter threads are great at driving engagement, but can be tricky. I do one regularly for @Sree’s Sunday #NYTReadalong.

Here are a few tips to make sure your thread works well. (Note, these answers are a part of my #ContentChat Twitter Thread.)https://t.co/YArTRvymL2 pic.twitter.com/uTm5vT6H0N

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A3b. Number your tweets. If you share your tweets over time, your first tweet keeps getting pushed to the top. Each tweet should serve a different purpose. Use images and tag 10 accounts, use retweet with comment.#NYTReadalong Example:https://t.co/N0cagsTU18#ContentChat

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A3c. Interesting note about Twitter Threads and Retweet with Comment. If you look at someone’s quote tweets and it’s part of a thread, it will pick up two of your tweets.

Check out this example from a #NYTReadalong Thread quoting @williaqj.https://t.co/L6oEH30g4P#ContentChat pic.twitter.com/gs8o4vkHYw

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

Context is key. Also tagging people is a great way to get more eyes on a tweet. #ContentChat

— Julia Weeks 📸 #APPHOTOARCHIVE (@julialweeks) August 2, 2021

Christine views Twitter threads as food for thought and conversation starters. Build threads around topics that your community will want to talk about. She also recommends you use photos, GIFs, or short videos to keep people engaged.

A3a.
The best threads are food for thought and conversation starters, not just a series of one-sided things the writer wishes to broadcast.
Ideally, make it something people will want to quote-tweet with their own thoughts on the matter. ❤️ #ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

A3b.
Also, don’t be afraid of a pattern interrupt—you can include photos, GIFs, even short videos to keep people engaged through to the end of your thread’s story. ❤️ #ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

And pin your thread so it’s the first thing people see when they go to your page.

A3c.
I feel like I mainly see threads skyrocket when it ties into something trending/timely, but ISN’T just newsjacking for numbers.
If it’s someone people already look to for thoughts on the topic, their thread will likely do well.
(also, don’t forget to pin it!)#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

Share your experience and lessons learned, or break down strategies or case studies of what has worked. For both, you need to explain why you’re an expert on the topic.

A3. Love this Q! I’ve noticed two types of threads work well:

• Ones that share your experience + lessons learned
• Ones that breakdown strategies, share case studies

In either case, start with telling why you’re good at offering d advice + back with numbers. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

Twitter threads 🧵 tend to work best when the user shares a personal & detailed account, relating to an experience or issue they’ve faced! I’ve yet to see a global brand tweet a topical thread or one which isn’t a paid promo! #ContentChat

— Jeremy Singer 🌔 (@JeremySinger1) August 2, 2021

A3a:
✅I started using Twitter threads to write profiles of different #WomenToFollow. Used threads to build story of person’s career, accomplishments, & asked them to name their #WomenToFollow. I’ve written 17 & then posted them as blogs on @medium.#contentchat https://t.co/0RPwhY3Z72

— Rose Horowitz, #WomentoFollow, #SreeShow (@RoseHorowitz31) August 2, 2021

Use a hashtag to brand your thread.

A3. *Twitter threads*
🤩 Start with a summary what to expect in quality + quantity
💡 One thought – one post, paginate if helpful
# Use a hashtag on threads to brand it
🎆 End with a thank you, questions/CTA + reminder to share the thread#ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 2, 2021

And don’t forget to include a call to action.

Plus, add a CTA. Good threads always have an action item at the end.

Sadly, it’s focused on increasing followers (which is a vanity metric in my view).

A better idea is to ask people to retweet the thread or read your blog or join your newsletter. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

Q4: What are some unique ways to use live stream video content to reach community members across channels?

Neil and his team at Digimentors use StreamYard to stream to multiple channels simultaneously.

A4a. At @Digimentors, we use @streamyardapp for 90% of our livestreams. It’s key to driving our multi-platform community, particularly around the #NYTReadalong. It allows us to stream to multiple channels simultaneously.#ContentChathttps://t.co/pFAbdmKUch pic.twitter.com/noN6GmQyPI

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A4b. For example, when @JohnBranchNYT was our guest on @Sree’s Sunday #NYTReadalong, we streamed to Sree’s FB, TW, LI, YT, our website and several of John’s channels.

All of the comments were visible on one screen, at our discretion.https://t.co/VyfZROnGgO#ContentChat

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

Per Christine, if you’re looking to build one specific platform’s following, though, stream just to that channel and promote the stream across your other channels.

A4c.
As for “cross-platform,” I’ve embraced multistreaming to different platforms.
If you’re working to build your numbers on one specific platform, don’t do this; PROMOTE it hard on every platform, but go live to one.
But I’m meeting people where they are.
❤️ #ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

Christine also notes that live video is no longer novel. You need to encourage your community to join in on the live stream, make them feel like part of the broadcast, and reward their participation. She recommends asking for community questions, insights, and contributions in advance.

A4a.
Live video is no longer novel. To make it worth doing, you must make viewers feel like part of the broadcast. Encourage people to join live, and reward their participation with live interaction.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

A4b.
You can also solicit questions, insights, contributions, etc. in advance; people will want to tune in to see if you’ve incorporated their feedback. It creates buy-in.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

In Neil’s case, the #NYTReadalong participants are excited to see their name and face on the live stream feed that displays questions and answers from the chat.

We find the best way to do that is to show their comments and questions on the screen and to read them out during @Sree’s Sunday #NYTReadalong. Everyone loves seeing their name and face on the screen and getting their question answered. #contentchat https://t.co/NqsW8ljgJo

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

So true! I used to record my SWTOR podcast live while hosting a livechat in an online platform and we’d always incorporate audience feedback and questions into the podcast as we went along. It made it more fun for all of us. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

Consider a daily video content cadence to create consistency for your community. It’s OK if these videos are short, simple, or informal, as long as they are on brand and provide value to your community in some way.

A4: I used to find that the everyday events going on at our organization drew more live viewers. You don’t have to always think big (announcements, guest Q&As). Keeping it simple is OK. Community members can appreciate that inside look at your day-to-day. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 2, 2021

With the past 18 months of people increasingly working from home, it’s nice to “see” folks in a casual setting. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

Great tips for interactive live #video sessions. For example I like site and #landingpage audits#ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 2, 2021

Yes! I want to do a set of live LinkedIn profile remakes. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

Actively ask your community about what topics they’d like to learn more about through a live video. At a minimum, you can host an open Q&A on a specific topic.

A4. I’d say a good way to engage your community with livestream video content involves:
• Asking them if they’re interested in live seasons. If so, at what time?
• Creating interactive seasons. Example: by offering live critiques.
• Always having a Q&A session.#ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

Q5: Many marketers are doubling down on email marketing to nurture their communities. How can you drive engagement through email?

Email marketing can be an incredibly effective way to reach your community. However, a necessary disclaimer anytime we discuss email marketing: Do not buy your email lists or opt people into your list without their permission.

A5a. #EmailMarketing is definitely underutilized and underrated. It’s still the best way to reach out to people. I send a weekly email to friends of the #NYTReadalong and previous guests with links and information on each week’s show.#ContentChathttps://t.co/tfJKTYP6xb pic.twitter.com/CCZKH8KZce

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A5b. @Sree’s weekly newsletter has several thousand subscribers. It’s a great way to get the word out about our livestream events and to keep people engaged. When I worked at @UnitedWay, I edited a daily newsletter that went to 13,000. https://t.co/Rbbvog4LTA#ContentChat

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

Use email marketing to complement your other communications channels. Provide a unique value through email that your community cannot get from your other channels.

A5.
Email is such a strong and intimate method of connection! Make sure your emails, your social media channels, and even your website are all working together to build one interconnected ecosystem that people feel good being a bigger and bigger part of.#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

Get personal and openly discuss the challenges that your team or your customers have faced and the best solutions to these challenges. Or, provide a behind-the-scenes look at your brand.

A5. By telling stories. Get personal, tell people about what’s worked for you, what’s happening behind the scenes, and sharing the most value that you have to offer. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

Segment your email list so that you can deliver the best content to your readers based on their needs and preferred ways to consume content. Improve your strategy by directly asking your subscribers what they want, and monitor for click-throughs to see what content they enjoy most.

A5. With a segmented #email list you got gold in your hands. Make use of this exclusive connection straight to your potential customer’s inbox + send them ‘love’ letters: With valuable #content. Ask what they want. Track what they like. Give them what they need.#ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 2, 2021

And never ever ever auto-sign them up for generic emails! 🙂 #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

One final email marketing tip: Send your emails from a real human. Your readers need a way to reply to and actually reach your team.

Yes to all of this! And I’d add that you want your emails and particularly your email newsletters to come from a real human being. One who you can hit reply and actually reach, not just a signature field in a marketing automation tool. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

You can learn more ways to improve your email marketing strategy with these #ContentChat recaps on how to build a loyal community around your email newsletter with Josh Spector and email marketing hacks that drive results with Nancy Harhut.

Q6: How can marketers use Facebook for content marketing and community development?

Two Facebook features are particularly effective for content marketing: Facebook Groups and events.

A6a. FB is also a good tool for #ContentMarketing. When you tag people in your post, it will likely show up on their timeline / notify their friends (depending on their settings). FB events are also helpful for the reminders they send out.#ContentChathttps://t.co/RZT2wuLiVn pic.twitter.com/FQyaAboYam

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

Facebook Groups can be a great space to share valuable resources—which can involve brand content, alongside third-party resources and other content—and drive meaningful conversation.

A6b. Another great FB tool for #ContentMarketing is Facebook Groups. @Sree and @wordwhacker run Sree’s Advanced Social Media Group on Facebook. With >10K members, it’s not only great for discussion but also good for promoting content. https://t.co/BOOHEEZcY7#ContentChat pic.twitter.com/Es21wvwHt9

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A6.
Facebook is great for all sorts of content: text, images, videos, live, events, etc.
And GROUPS are especially powerful, since the algorithm loves them.
Start groups altruistically. Get people talking. Put content in them that serves instead of sells.
❤️#ContentChat

— Christine Gritmon ❤️ #ChatAboutBrand (@cgritmon) August 2, 2021

Remember that Facebook Groups can be used for internal and external audiences.

A6: I think groups are the way to go with Facebook. Think internal *and* external groups. Building loyal supporters and a robust community on the inside is important, too. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 2, 2021

But your success with Facebook Groups will depend on how much time you can dedicate to the community. If you are unable to actively share resources, monitor for and spark conversation, and otherwise address your community needs, your Group will likely not succeed.

With you on this and Facebook Groups is how I also wanted to answer this Q.

Important to mention here that FB Groups are only as effective as the amount of work you put into them. So be sure to invest resources before you create a Group. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

As with any online community, we strongly recommend you create community guidelines for a Facebook Group.

This includes having thoughtful—and evenly enforced—community guidelines. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

Q7: What are some examples of brands that have been successful in building a multi-platform community? Are there learnings you can share from communities you’ve created or been a part of?

Neil and the #ContentChat community share their favorite brands, organizations, and individuals with a multi-platform community. Did we miss your favorites? Let us know in the comments.

A7a. The key to our success in building an online multi-platform community around @Sree’s Sunday #NYTReadalong is to have colleagues engage with the audience in the comments by sharing links, answering questions and providing context. https://t.co/loCwhBb0kc pic.twitter.com/To5GfvKY40

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A7b. Too many brands set up livestreams by just pointing a camera at the speaker. While @Sree interviews the guest and I produce using @StreamYard, others manage the community. @biggreenpen wrote about our #NYTReadalong community. 👇#ContentChathttps://t.co/YcCSDCudCZ pic.twitter.com/nsiMZN9vwj

— Neil Parekh (He / Him / His) (@neilparekh) August 2, 2021

A7. I like @Headspace and @calm’s multi-platform community building.

What’s worth learning from them: they don’t C + P content but tweak it to meet the platform’s requirements and their platform-specific audience expectations. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 2, 2021

A7: The #CMworld community from @CMIcontent is a fantastic example of a multi-platform community that makes fantastic use of the differences in the various social platforms. Hat-tip to @MoninaW for that! #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 2, 2021

A7:
✳️Some brands, individuals successful at building multi-platform: @MadalynSklar!
She has recently started using @TwitterSpaces to talk about all things audio & made it into a podcast.

✳️@sree w/ his #COVID19 show. Viewers on 4 platforms and a global audience.#contentchat

— Rose Horowitz, #WomentoFollow, #SreeShow (@RoseHorowitz31) August 2, 2021

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