October 17, 2022 Content Chat Recap: How Content Marketers Can Set a Better Writing Foundation

A Content Chat header image that says today's topic is how content marketers can set a better writing foundation, with guest Anne Janzer, who is @AnneJanzer on Twitter.

The time it takes to finish a writing project depends on multiple factors that are completely within our control.

Too often, writers fail to do the necessary preparation work—eagerly opting to begin writing without researching their topic, outlining their thoughts, or gaining client approval—or we let common distractors stop us from creating great content. When we commit to overcoming these challenges, though, we can consistently create incredible work easier than we ever thought possible.

In this #ContentChat recap we explain how content marketers can set a better writing foundation with Anne Janzer, an award-winning author, nonfiction writing coach, and marketing practitioner.

Learn more about Anne’s The Writer’s Process and The Writer’s Process Workbook, and read the full recap below to learn:

  • How to find inspiration for your writing
  • Ways to efficiently review your content
  • Tips for strengthening your writing skills

Q1: What does your writer’s process look like?

The community shares their writer’s processes below. Most of us start a new writing project by conducting research, outlining our content, and freewriting to get our initial thoughts down. Then we start writing the ugly first draft, conduct more research to fill in gaps, and finally conduct a full review.

A1: My personal process has multiple parts:

Freewriting
Research (as needed)
Outline/structure notes
Ugly first draft
Revise
Polish and publish

If I lump them together or skip one, I regret it. #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

A1: The simplified version:
– Topic ideation/agreement (for a client piece)
– Keyword research to inform structure/understand intent
– Outline
– Draft
– Edits

TL:DR; Never start with a blank page! #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

A1a: For my book, I started with a rough outline, starting with the sections, then the chapters I knew I wanted to include. I sort of jumped around a lot while I was writing depending on where my mind was at. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) October 17, 2022

A1b: From a physical process perspective, I wrote on the weekends and breaks. And usually from a @McDonalds (with a large Diet Coke and cookies) or from another restaurant or similar location. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) October 17, 2022

A1c: When it comes to my blog posts, I usually have an idea or thought and just start writing. Sometimes on my phone, sometimes on my laptop. Usually in the evenings or on weekends. I don’t really have much of a standard process for blogs. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) October 17, 2022

A1: PHEW haha!
Observation (may include eavesdropping. Plz don’t judge. I have sharp ears)
Hypothesis
Research
Outline
Beat myself up over introductions
Writer, edit, rewrite
Publish #ContentChat

— Vuh-suun-dher-ah (She/Her) (@ThisDhara) October 17, 2022

A1: It starts with:

– Keyword research (to double check if it’s been awhile since I pulled the analytics reports).

then outlining, then drafts, then revisions, then adding visualizations, then proofread, then publish! 😊#ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) October 17, 2022

A1:
-Preliminary research
-Start sourcing SME
-Outline with headers, subheaders, bullets, and stats
-More research
-Write (body > conclusion > intro)
-Edit (my work is always v. messy prior to edits, a few rounds of edits polish it off and pull it together!)#ContentChat

— Dana Nicole | SaaS Writer + SEO (@dana_nic0le) October 17, 2022

A1: Writing process:

Write words.
Tell stories.
Make someone smile.
Sometimes all for me 😉

Not a whole lot of process involved. Write. That’s the key. #contentChat https://t.co/9ygg5M90WS

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) October 17, 2022

A1: I’m not sure I have much of a “process” exactly but:

1. structure and format what I’m going to write mentally first.

2. let this sit and continue to think of sub topics of the main topic

3. write out my introduction then my subheadings

4. Edit as I go#ContentChat

— Benjamin Katz (@BKatz301) October 17, 2022

A1: My writer’s process can be a bit scattered:
– Research
– Create a rough outline w/ headers and subheads
– Build out body (starting with sections that I feel more prepared to discuss)
– More research to fill in gaps
– Tackle intro and conclusion
– Full review#ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) October 17, 2022

Q2: Where do you find inspiration for your writing? Are there specific times, places, or activities that spark your inspiration?

Anne and the community share their sources of inspiration below. Where do you find inspiration for your writing? Pay attention and notice when ideas come flowing your way. Engage in these activities more often if you’re feeling stuck on a project.

A2a I cherish periods of “open attention” — walking outdoors, doing mindless tasks, and of course, taking a shower! 🛀 Any time I can let my mind wander. #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

A2b Cross-pollination is another source, so I read widely to feed my curiosity. #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

A2c Other people inspire me. I believe in Servant Authorship—so this chat is a perfect example of an inspiring event! #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

A2: I find inspiration for writing all over the place! Most frequently:

– Chatting with other marketers
– Standing in line @Target
– Drifting off to sleep
-Take @lyft to and from @TheUrbanHive
– Reading Twitter + blogs + magazines#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

A2:

1. Reading authority blogs (both in and outside of my niche)
2. Reading research papers
3. Websites like https://t.co/1wBUSq3iWq that share random but interesting stories
4. And lastly, talking with other freelancers often sparks ideas #ContentChat

— Dana Nicole | SaaS Writer + SEO (@dana_nic0le) October 17, 2022

A2: Writing inspiration comes in many forms for me! Both inside my industry & outside of it too. It’s good to get out of your brain/industry echochamber. But tangible sources include:
– Newsletters
– Books
– Conferences/attendee chats
– Colleagues
– Podcasts/webinars #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

A2: Inspiration often strikes when I take some time away from my computer and wander my house or handle some quick household needs.

If I’m completely stuck, 1-3 cups of coffee can help… #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) October 17, 2022

Whenever I hear a writer or content creator say they don’t read anyone else’s content, it gives me pause. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

A2. Books and movies/shows. Experiencing new things helps too because I can use those as stories in my content.

P.S. sorry I’m late – here for a bit 🙂 #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) October 17, 2022

A2: I find inspiration for writing all over the place! Most frequently:

– Chatting with other marketers
– Standing in line @Target
– Drifting off to sleep
-Take @lyft to and from @TheUrbanHive
– Reading Twitter + blogs + magazines#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

Twitter gives me lots of ideas. Except I don’t buy the time to execute them all lol. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) October 17, 2022

Which reminds me: walking gives me lots of ideas too! I think it’s about giving the brain a break so it can come up with some good stuff 🙂 #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) October 17, 2022

A2: Usually in my own interactions with other brands’ marketing. For instance, I did a blog post on how much I love @homedepot because their app is so great to use. It was based on personal experience. #ContentChat https://t.co/PonAghFwyf

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) October 17, 2022

A2: in the everyday. I’ve realized that mostly if I can be present and intentional in a moment, I can find inspiration. Books, music, pamphlets, billboards, interactions among/with ppl, being outdoors, visiting art fairs/farmers markets and on and on #ContentChat

— Vuh-suun-dher-ah (She/Her) (@ThisDhara) October 17, 2022

A2:

1. Reading authority blogs (both in and outside of my niche)
2. Reading research papers
3. Websites like https://t.co/1wBUSq3iWq that share random but interesting stories
4. And lastly, talking with other freelancers often sparks ideas #ContentChat

— Dana Nicole | SaaS Writer + SEO (@dana_nic0le) October 17, 2022

A2: sometimes what I’m learning can help me come up with better words and language to use. I mostly do my best work late at night, so that’s when I usually sit down and can get my thoughts down on paper#ContentChat

— Benjamin Katz (@BKatz301) October 17, 2022

Q3: What practices do you follow to strengthen your writing skills?

There are plenty of ways to strengthen your writing skills. Write in multiple genres to sharpen your storytelling skills…

A3: I like to write in multiple genres to keep storytelling skills sharpened. Flash fiction is always a great way to push those skills.

All good writing will have elements of storytelling!#ContentChat https://t.co/HYjqfof01L

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) October 17, 2022

This is a good reminder for me about @ReedsyHQ’s weekly creative writing contest prompts — would be a great way to try writing about multiple different topics/genres! #ContentChat pic.twitter.com/iwDd74xKip

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

I use to have a jar on my desk full of random words. When I needed a writing prompt or a block breaker, I’d draw out three words, set a 10 minute timer, and craft something that included those three words. :D#ContentChat

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) October 17, 2022

Commit to writing every day…

A3b For example, to strengthen my #storytelling skills, I challenged myself to write a story every day for a year in a journal #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

A3: just trying to write more and more. Practice makes perfect

Also, I try to read more of others’ work#ContentChat

— Benjamin Katz (@BKatz301) October 17, 2022

Experiment with different content formats to challenge yourself…

A3. Trying different content format. For example, writing tweets and LinkedIn posts.

It helps sharpen the writing muscle as I challenge myself more this way #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) October 17, 2022

Dedicate time to reading the news and learning about trends in your industry…

A3: Setting time aside to catch up on the latest SEO news. Always looking for new resources to read. And Books and Movies on occassion. #ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) October 17, 2022

Look up words if you’re unclear on the definition…

A3: Writing daily has helped me become a more confident writer. Also, I look up words to ensure I’m using them right—doing this daily has greatly shifted how I use certain words. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) October 17, 2022

Set goals for your content and strive to do better each time…

A3: I set goals for myself for content engagement, decreasing the number of suggested edits @Grammarly has for me, ideal @CoSchedule headline analyzer scores for my favorite headlines, etc. And then I try to just do better each time.
#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

We used to play the headline game in our house. I’d give a topic or article idea and everyone would come up with headlines and see who would get the highest analyzer score :D#ContentChat

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) October 17, 2022

Constantly read other people’s content…

A3: The biggest thing is to be constantly reading and exposing myself to how others effectively use language. I set and achieve a goal to read 52 books (1/week) each year to stay on track.

Engaging in creating other types of art also helps me think creatively. #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

This is super important for me too. The more I read, the better writer I become, I feel.

Not sure how that works/the science behind this, but reading helps not only improve writing but also generate more ideas, connect dots better, and structure arguments better #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) October 17, 2022

A3: I try to read slowly so I can grasp diff learnings from a piece/story. I try to identify why something spoke to me and if I can use that. I try to write thoughtfully even in everyday communication as much as possible without having my friends think I’m nuts! #ContentChat

— Vuh-suun-dher-ah (She/Her) (@ThisDhara) October 17, 2022

I think it comes down to learning by example. I feel like whatever the topic, I always learn best when someone shows me their process. So the way an author puts a sentence together is like an insight into their writing process. #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

A3:

Actively reading other people’s work by printing off an article (or using a tablet) and breaking it down. What do I like? What format does it follow? How would I improve it?#ContentChat

— Dana Nicole | SaaS Writer + SEO (@dana_nic0le) October 17, 2022

Adopt a growth mindset…

A2a: To strengthen my writing skills, I adopt a growth mindset—I am always learning and improving. And #writing. #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

Seek feedback on your work…

A3c: On strengthening my skills: I also seek feedback, work with editors, and try to put myself out of my comfort zone #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

Seeking feedback can be scary, but getting the gift of honest, constructive feedback is worth the occasional discomfort.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

And take notes when reading content. Bookmark stories that you can reference when creating future content.

I’m a fan of active reading! I make notes — adding my thoughts, related stories + findings, and new ideas as I read.

That’s helps me extensively and in so many ways! #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) October 17, 2022

I’ve gotten into this habit as well from using @Flipboard to curate content for clients (and myself). I frequently include specific quotes from the piece + notes on what I found interesting/relatable.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

I highlight and tab all over the books I read. It is one of the reasons I added a section at the end of each chapter in my book for people to write down any inspiration they got from that chapter. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) October 17, 2022

Q4: How do you hold yourself accountable for accomplishing your writing goals?

Follow these tips to hold yourself accountable for accomplishing your writing goals: Make a promise to other people and communicate your goals…

A4 I make a promise to other people — my #writing #community. That really motivates me.

Also, I just told @SFerika the topic for my next book on a Tweet, so now I’m committed.#ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

A4: I actually started writing a YA novel about 10 years ago, but never finished. When I started writing #TheContentPuzzle, I started telling people about it. Then I figured there was no going back! People expected me to finish. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) October 17, 2022

Set due dates for all content…

A4: I have due dates that help me hold myself accountable

I’m trying to write more for myself and will post about it so that others know what I’m working on, which gives me the expectation to get something done#ContentChat

— Benjamin Katz (@BKatz301) October 17, 2022

I always find that even if a client doesn’t give me a deadline it’s a good idea to propose one because the act of telling them when to expect something holds me accountable better than no deadline and trying to hold myself accountable to finish something. #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

Stay on top of client deadlines…

A4. My entire career depends on it lol + I’m an avid learner (I like to keep improving).

I think both of these factors combine to serve as accountability buddies for me to achieve my writing goals. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) October 17, 2022

Join National Novel Writing Month…

A4: @NaNoWriMo came in clutch as an awesome accountability mechanism when I wrote my book. Highly recommend it whether you want to write a book or knock out a year’s worth of blog post ideas. #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

Set weekly quotas and identify key milestones…

A4: Setting weekly quotas and setting notifications for the milestones themselves. It’s not enough to just mark a content project as complete? (y/n)#ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) October 17, 2022

And use a project management tool to manage deadlines.

A4: To hold myself accountable for my writing goals, I share them in our #ContentChat conversations, put them on my @RedboothHQ board and editorial calendar, and ask @AlekIrvin to poke me about my deadlines!

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

Q5: Do you practice freewriting? If so, what are its benefits?

Freewriting is the act of sitting and writing for a set period of time. When freewriting, you’re not focused on editing or correcting, just getting your ideas out without stopping. It helps to set a timer when freewriting.

For those who haven’t heard of free writing before, it’s the act of sitting and writing—not editing or correcting, just writing—for a set period of time.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

A5: I would say I am more of a free scribbler. A mix of words and sketching. Haha. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) October 17, 2022

Freewriting stops your internal criticism and encourages you to share deep thoughts about your topic.

A5a: Yes to freewriting!! Every book and blog post I publish germinates from a sloppy file of freewriting.

Freewriting shuts down the inner critic and invites deep thought about a topic. (My inner critic is otherwise quite loud.) #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

A5: I do it often in my journal or phone. Also in my head! But the biggest benefit I find is that it serves as a meaningful grounding point for several other, more structured pieces. #ContentChat

— Vuh-suun-dher-ah (She/Her) (@ThisDhara) October 17, 2022

If you’re having a hard time starting a writing project, try to free write about it for several days.

A5b: If you’re having a hard time getting started in a writing project, commit instead to freewriting about it for several days. There’s magic in doing #writing that no one will see. #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

Freewriting can help you create more conversational content.

A5. I do. Specially for writing introductions (and for journaling).

Benefits:

• Better content ideas
• Better flow/narrative
• More conversational content #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) October 17, 2022

Engage in daily freewriting to work through challenges or think through your ideas.

A5: I free write in my journals, make sure to free write letters and notes to people (try to make it a daily habit), and free write to flesh out ideas – old school pencil and paper for that.#ContentChat

Set a timer and write https://t.co/idOufL8Ol6

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) October 17, 2022

I do my free writing with pen and paper, too! It keeps me focused on just writing. Not researching or editing or perfecting.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

A5: I use free writing as a therapy technique to work through emotions or think through difficult situations. When writing for work, free writing can help me throw all my ideas out there and then sift through and keep the good stuff. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) October 17, 2022

A5: Absolutely. It’s therapeutic. #ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) October 17, 2022

A5: constantly. Morning journals as a brain dump but as I switch between many topics free writing sprints help to change writing styles. Plus they help when you are running on empty but still need to write #ContentChat

— Nadia (@CottageNotebook) October 17, 2022

A5: I’ve done free writing in school. I never really understood it, but more and more I learned that it helps to just turn thoughts into words and get them down on paper. #ContentChat

— Benjamin Katz (@BKatz301) October 17, 2022

Maddy shares a few personal freewriting prompts below:

Q5: I “free write” with daily morning pages to purge limiting thoughts from my brain & address anything else that’s getting in the way of productivity/bothering me.

I learned about this idea in “The Artist’s Way” & highly recommend it + weekly Artist Dates. #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

The Artist’s Way: https://t.co/a5wq0lfegp

My tips for effective Artist Dates: https://t.co/jzLoa2xWSd #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

Sharing a few daily prompts for my personal free writing:
What are 3 things I’m excited about?
What are 3 things I’m grateful for?
What are 3 things I’m worried about?
What’s today’s focus? #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

Q6: How can writers coordinate an efficient (and hopefully painless) review process?

Be proactive when seeking reviews. Clearly explain who you need to review, what they need to review, and a realistic deadline.

A6a: Be proactive, not passive, when seeking reviews. Decide exactly who you need to ask and what you want from them. (And give them just enough time to review, not too much!) #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

A6b: On reviews: Be clear about explaining what you want from someone. Do you want copy-edits? Reassurance? Subject matter expertise?

If you give people free rein, chaos may ensue. #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

It is *so important* to let the reviewer know what you are seeking from them. Otherwise, they may propose frustrating (even if necessary) structural edits when you just wanted a final proof.#ContentChat https://t.co/ruHLoZDZl2

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

A6: From a client management standpoint, be clear about who needs to review what and their deadline. On PR teams especially I see people go back and forth a completely unnecessary amount of times, usually because too many people are brought in. #Contentchat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) October 17, 2022

If possible, set expectations and provide guidelines around what the review should entail and how feedback should be provided.

A6: If this involves working with clients, try setting expectations and providing guidelines around what constitutes effective feedback vs unhelpful feedback with specific examples.

It’s definitely an art to give great and useful feedback. #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

A6: Set guidelines for the review process. This is not the time to pretend you wrote a school book report 🤣🍭#ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) October 17, 2022

A6: At work, we align externally and internally before we begin work. While editing, I like to leave positive comments/feedback for the writers so we don’t keep making the same edits. We also use content briefs to stay aligned. Personally, I rope in (kind) friends #ContentChat

— Vuh-suun-dher-ah (She/Her) (@ThisDhara) October 17, 2022

A6: maybe writers could create review templates and then have others read their work. If they can understand it, then your writing is effective in getting a message across. Of course, it depends on who you’re writing for#ContentChat

— Benjamin Katz (@BKatz301) October 17, 2022

When creating content for a client, it’s often best to have them approve your outline and creative brief before you start writing.

Another tactic is to get sign-off on the outline and creative brief before writing. That shuts down late structural edits. #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

Yes! I don’t use outlines when writing for myself, but when creating a large piece of content for a client, I always have an outline be the first deliverable and require it be signed off on (and trigger an invoice) before writing the first draft. So helpful!#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

Consider doing an editing swap with your other writer friends.

A6: I like to do editing swaps with other writer friends on personal pieces. When self-editing, I do a top-of-mind proof and revision first, then run my piece through @Grammarly and @semrush.#ContentChat https://t.co/mF31OYBjqc

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) October 17, 2022

Q7: Self-care and compassion are vital to sustaining a career in writing. What are your self-care rituals, or how do you show compassion to yourself?

The community’s self-care rituals include taking mini breaks when we finish a time block…

A7: Take mini breaks every time you finish a timeblock. Helps your brand recover from intense thinking 😄#ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) October 17, 2022

Reading books unrelated to our field of work…

A7: Self-care is essential to creativity. My self-care rituals:

1. Getting out in nature. (Everything is better among the trees or at the shore.)
2. Reading a good book on an unrelated topic.

Then, I return to focusing on what the reader needs, recharged. #ContentChat

— Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) October 17, 2022

Taking care of ourselves physically and creatively…

A7: My self-care rituals center around taking care of my physical self (exercise, skincare routines, etc.) and creative self (hand lettering, baking, watercolor).

It’s important to make time for these things and to find a balance! #ContentChat

— Maddy Osman (French) (@MaddyOsman) October 17, 2022

Driving around while listening to our favorite songs…

When the weather is nice, I like to drive around with my windows down and my music up! I also scrapbook and bake. And, of course, spend time with my family. All these things give me peace. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) October 17, 2022

Engaging in hobbies like knitting, cooking, and exercising…

A7:

I knit/crochet, stretch, exercise, cook, and spend lots of time on things outside of work!#ContentChat

— Dana Nicole | SaaS Writer + SEO (@dana_nic0le) October 17, 2022

Chatting with strangers, friends, and family…

A7: I like to think I’m self-aware so when I acknowledge my drawbacks, I also acknowledge what I do well. I also like urban walking so anytime I get a chance, I head out. Window shopping, chatting with strangers is my self-care + being with my silly dog 🙂 #ContentChat

— Vuh-suun-dher-ah (She/Her) (@ThisDhara) October 17, 2022

And taking breaks to avoid burnout.

A7: I like to take breaks to avoid burnout. Your writing will only get worse if you go nonstop. You start to develop a mindset of “just get it done” at some point, which impacts the whole process#ContentChat

— Benjamin Katz (@BKatz301) October 17, 2022

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