August 30, 2021 Content Chat Recap: Why Customer Experience Can Be Your Best Marketing

A #ContentChat header image that says today's chat topic is why customer experience can be your best marketing, with guest Dan Gingiss.

Over the past years, brands have increasingly prioritized the customer experience to retain customers, drive new business, and ultimately stay ahead of the competition. But, who in an organization is responsible for customer experience, and how can teams consistently create incredible experiences?

In this #ContentChat, we’re joined by Dan Gingiss, customer experience speaker, coach, and author of The Experience Maker, to discuss why customer experience can be your best marketing. Dan shares a handful of learnings from his book—we received an advanced copy and, trust us, you want to grab a copy—including how you can use his WISE methodology to find ways to elevate your customer experience (with examples of brands doing this well). Read the full recap below, and tweet us your examples of WISE brand experiences with #ContentChat.

Q1: What is customer experience? How do you define it?

The customer experience is how customers feel about every single interaction with your brand.

A1: #CustomerExperience is how customers feel about every single interaction with your brand. The “feel” part is important because perception = reality, and it’s important to remember that EVERY interaction counts. #ContentChat https://t.co/gYaUXUUHR4

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

A1 Customer experience is the sum total of every interaction a customer has with your company—from their first glance at your store facade or email or website through to using the product at home. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 30, 2021

A1.
The overall impression that a customer has in the whole encounters and relationship with a company or brand.#ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 30, 2021

A1: not sure it matters how ‘we’ define it — what matters is what customers think it means. #ContentChat

— Tiffani Bova (@Tiffani_Bova) August 30, 2021

These interactions include all your communications through email and social media, as well as when your customers search for your products, navigate your website, hear about your product from friends, or simply see your product on store shelves.

A1: Customer experience is the emotional response to each aspect of your brand.

If they go to your website, how do they feel?
If they’re in your physical space, how are they treated?
If you email them, do they open immediately or delete?

Each touchpoint matters. #ContentChat

— Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 30, 2021

A1. Customer experience is the sum of all interactions a customer has with your business — from the time they discover your business, become a lead to post-purchase emails. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

I had a great chat with Val at @forepoint about this for a project we’re doing. She pointed out that our potential customers and or future employees and colleagues can be any age: think school projects to post-retirement consulting. So it’s every touch point. #ContentChat 🤗

— Katherine Wildman | Haydn Grey (@haydngrey) August 30, 2021

A1: The process of how customers interact with your brand and how they feel during those interactions. Finding your product, navigating a website, finding information about a product/service, interactions with sales teams, using the product/service, etc. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 30, 2021

A1: The way a business or brand interacts with the people buying their products. It can also make or break relationships and convince others to buy/not buy the product or service again. #ContentChat

— Christian McIlwain (@cpmcilwain) August 30, 2021

A1. The whole process of interaction between a customer and a brand/business/company. It can be an enquiry, a transaction or a visit. #ContentChat

— Daniel Warui (@warmurd) August 30, 2021

A1 Customer experience is how the customer felt through the whole process of working with a company – either through finding, purchasing and using a product, or with an offered service
-Alyx #ContentChat https://t.co/MDQuYwYSQj

— Charlie & Alyx – Charlie Appel Agency (@ColfaxInsurance) August 30, 2021

A1: Customer experience is the perceived/experienced interaction between a business or service & the customer. #ContentChat https://t.co/mQYPJPDwaV

— Cathrine Alexandra Nelson (@cathrinewith1e) August 30, 2021

Every member of your team can impact the customer experience, and this experience is not tied to a single medium or channel.

A1: At a basic level, a customer experience reflects every interaction that a customer has with a brand, whether direct or indirect. The experience is created by ALL of your brand’s teams, including marketing, sales, PR, design, customer success, etc. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 30, 2021

A1: I view customer experince as not being tied to one medium or channel. It can be the website, it can be in person etc. It is the experience they have with the brand and how it makes them feel. #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger (@B2the7) August 30, 2021

Q2: What is an Experience Maker?

An Experience Maker is a person (or people) who prioritize the customer in everything they do. Per Dan, Experience Makers are always looking to turn an ordinary experience into an extraordinary one, remembering that even the smallest details can make a huge impact.

A2a: An Experience Maker is the person (or people) at a company who view every business decision through a customer lens. #ContentChat https://t.co/YrRsep0nid

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

A2b: The Experience Maker is the person (or people) who are always looking to turn ordinary experiences into extraordinary ones. The smallest details can really add up to a superior #customerexperience. #ContentChat https://t.co/YrRsep0nid

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

A2.
Taking care to ensure a pleasant customer experience. A ‘Feel good’ manager and ‘tour guide’ in the whole customer journey . Not necessarily a single job role. More of a team effort from everyone on the team.

Hopefully not an experience breaker 😅#ContentChat #ux pic.twitter.com/FdlAx92Pu8

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 30, 2021

A2 The Experience Maker is in charge of keeping the prospect/client interested and focused on for all interactions with staff, support, CS, etc (at least that’s how I understand it)
-Alyx #ContentChat https://t.co/L7yMzJjsV3

— Charlie & Alyx – Charlie Appel Agency (@ColfaxInsurance) August 30, 2021

Anyone on your team can, and should, be empowered to be an Experience Maker.

Do you think a team can be an experience maker or does it have to be a dedicated person? #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

Anyone can be an experience maker, and the companies that are really customer-centric (think Amazon) empower every employee to be one. #ContentChat

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

A2: An Experience Maker is anyone who can play a role in elevating your customer experience (so, anyone on your team). These people aren’t afraid to go beyond “check this box” tactics and assess how even the most routine things can be reworked to be remarkable. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 30, 2021

I like this idea! An experience makers doesn’t have to be a dedicated person. Instead, everyone on the team and in different departments can and should wear this hat. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

Many professionals immediately think of marketers, designers, and user experience professionals as leading the customer experience, but literally every department and person on your team can have a role in shaping the customer experience.

A2: In my line of work, the experience maker is the UX or Service Designer.

This person is responsible for keeping the customer engaged & centered at all times, which also means working with support staff to ensure positive responses to those interactions, too. #ContentChat

— Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 30, 2021

#UX is such a key component to the overall customer experience! So much of our experiences are digital that we need to ensure a simple, seamless digital journey. #ContentChat

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

This could be a variety of people depending on your industry, company size and the product/service you offer. Customer success positions pop up first, but it could be UX designers, sales reps, project managers, account managers… #ContentChat https://t.co/K3Cu4NTIKu

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 30, 2021

A2: An Experience Maker to me is the icing on the cake. A customer may have come to you with the anticipation of receiving a ‘cake’ (your good or service). The ‘icing’ is the decorative/memorable piece that pushes everything to the next level. #ContentChat https://t.co/dHw58k9RmK

— Cathrine Alexandra Nelson (@cathrinewith1e) August 30, 2021

Can you think of any Experience Makers? Let us know in the comments!

My friend @allen is totally an experience maker. @JoePulizzi too! #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 30, 2021

Dan’s book The Experience Maker thoroughly explains how you can become an Experience Maker on your team.

A2c: “The Experience Maker” is the title of my new book which will be released September 14th! #ContentChathttps://t.co/CVf3MPftdW https://t.co/YrRsep0nid

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

Q3: In your book, you share your WISE methodology for identifying and creating remarkable experiences. What does the acronym stand for, and how do marketers put its components into action?

WISE stands for Witty, Immersive, Shareable, and Extraordinary. There is another letter that completes the acronym, and you’ll learn about it in the book.

A3a: The book aims to make readers “wise” to #customerexperience. WISE stands for:

Witty
Immersive
Shareable
Extraordinary

These are 4 ways to create experiences that customers want to share with others. #ContentChat https://t.co/RcmR3eNNHy

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

Witty means being clever, using language to your advantage, and refusing to be boring. Check out a few examples below.

A3c: The “W” stands for “Witty”. This doesn’t mean being hilarious, but rather three things:

1. Cleverness
2. Using language to your advantage
3. Refusing to be boring#ContentChat https://t.co/RcmR3eNNHy

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

A3d: Right before #ContentChat started, I was enjoying a bag of @GarrettPopcorn. The message on the bag that has “want” crossed out and replaced with “need” is a great example of being Witty. https://t.co/RcmR3eNNHy pic.twitter.com/SLS8L5fntY

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

This is one of the best social media moments I’ve seen on a physical product in a long time. they don’t just list their social handle and what channels they are active on—they do it with something worth sharing!#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 30, 2021

For example: @FourSigmatic (a mushroom wellness brand) says “We Love to Chat So Mush” on its packaging instead of “Contact us here.” #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 30, 2021

Their team also has a little note on the bottom of the box if you choose to open it that way. I also enjoy when brands do something a little special with their barcodes. #ContentChat pic.twitter.com/uoap3yMbg2

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 30, 2021

This is great. I always advocate using the “whole” box if you have a physical product. I’ve even seen messages hidden under the flaps so you only see them when you go to recycle the box… #ContentChat

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

Great experiences do not require all 4 elements of WISE, and teams should explore each area in a brand-relevant way.

A3b: The good news is you don’t have to use all 4 elements in WISE (in fact it’s very hard to do so). But even using one will improve any #customerexperience to make it more memorable and remarkable (literally: worthy of remark). #ContentChat https://t.co/RcmR3eNNHy

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

While all 4 of these are important, I know that when something is especially witty, that’s what always makes me smile and prompts me to share my experience. You never know which of these 4 will be the “thing” for your customer. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 30, 2021

Yes, Erika! Many people are drawn to Witty. Just remember that ANY brand can be clever and refuse to be boring. You don’t to be one of “those” brands that everyone knows is funny. #ContentChat https://t.co/cwdC7a0Mxl

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

Q4: When looking to create memorable customer experiences, what should companies strive for? What qualities make an idea more viable than others?

Customer listening is an essential part of improving your customer experience. Look for challenges that your customers face, listen to their requests, and run ideas by them early and often.

A4a. It’s always helpful to run ideas by some customers first. Customer listening (both Voice of the Customer and what I call Actions of the Customer, not to be confused with that other AOC) will generate so many great ideas. #contentchat https://t.co/PSpdIZdzLL

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

A4.
First, it should be memorable in a good way 😁.
🤩 Ensure to listen to your audience/customers and be open-minded.
🤩 Review website, processes and all stages of the journey
🤩 If something goes wrong, take care of it. Don’t let negative reviews stand alone. #ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 30, 2021

Remember to start small. Focus on small, meaningful improvements that address your customer pain points.

A4b: Look for opportunities in small places. #CustomerExperience doesn’t have to be a massive, multi-year, super-expensive transformation. It can be a series of little improvements and resolving customer pain points. #ContentChat https://t.co/PSpdIZdzLL

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

I really appreciate your point that it can be a series of little improvements and resolving customer pain points. @amazinggrass updated its packaging with the settling disclaimer, which addresses a common question of “Why is this package less filled than my last one?”#contentchat pic.twitter.com/MviF76xt4H

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 30, 2021

So important! Small interactions, small changes can make a big difference in the long run. It shows you care and you’re paying attention. #ContentChat https://t.co/xWhgAlYwz0

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 30, 2021

Per Dan, the best ideas to improve your customer experience should be simple, practical, and inexpensive.

A4c: All of the examples in my book have to pass through three filters, because I spent 20+ years in Corporate America so I know how hard it is to execute anything. They have to be:

1. Simple
2. Practical
3. Inexpensive#customerexperience #ContentChat https://t.co/PSpdIZdzLL

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

Remember to stay on brand with everything you do. A witty, immersive, shareable, or extraordinary experience for one brand’s customers may not achieve the same result for a different brand.

A4: It is not only standing out but being able to listen and creating an experience that meets or exceeds expectations while staying true to your brand voice/mission #ContentChat

— Bernie Fussenegger (@B2the7) August 30, 2021

A4: Do something different but in the realm of something your audience would like. What may be different and memorable for one company may be disastrous for another. #ContentChat

— Christian McIlwain (@cpmcilwain) August 30, 2021

Agreed. We should aim to be different but never unfamiliar or confusing under the guise of ‘different’#ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

Yes, making sure the experience is “on brand” is important. #ContentChat

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

The community shares a few ways that they gauge if a piece of content was helpful, as well as a handful of common experience challenges that you can easily address.

A4: There’s a hierarchy to memorable experiences, & errors occur/customers get mad when the hierarchy is misaligned. In order:

1. The experience should work as I expect. No weird guessing.

2. It should give info I didn’t know I needed.

3. It should delight me!#ContentChat

— Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 30, 2021

A4. Most important IMO is making things easy for people. This is pretty broad in itself.

For example:

• ensure your page load speed is excellent
• product descriptions are clear
• checkout doesn’t involve tons of steps
• shopping fees is shared upfront #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

A4: When appropriate, surprise and delight with a personal interaction from time to time. Every service-client conversation doesn’t have to be about work. We do this at @WriterGirlAssoc with “moment makers.” https://t.co/uteTgMpA5y #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 30, 2021

A4: Companies should strive to give authentic insight on products and services through the voices and stories of existing customers — this sets you apart from the competition.

User-generated content can live on product pages, home pages, emails, social, and more. #ContentChat

— Pixlee (@pixlee) August 30, 2021

Yess! Making it easy and super simple for customers is often enough. Because that’s something often overlooked—probably because people don’t understand it’s worth. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

Q5: How can brands create a cohesively immersive experience?

An immersive experience involves consistency across the customer journey and appealing to the customers’ emotions or senses.

A5a. “Immersive” is about being consistent across the customer journey and appealing to customers’ emotions or senses. #ContentChat https://t.co/DFKm6awG0t

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

A5a. Think about a brand like @Starbucks. Yes, it’s about the coffee, but it’s also about the atmosphere, the comfortable chairs, the smiling baristas, that SMELL of coffee beans and pastries. I know your company isn’t a coffee shop but we can all learn from them. #ContentChat https://t.co/DFKm6awG0t

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

This reminds me of @Burke_Williams. From the moment you step through the door, everything about the environment and the service puts you at ease so you can relax and focus on the self-care experience you are there for that day. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 30, 2021

Good one. As Starbucks’ CEO, Howard Schultz, famously said: “we aren’t in the business of coffee, we’re in the business of people.” And that eloquently sums up how brands should be thinking about customer experience. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

Amen! Or as Scott Wise of @brewhouse famously said: “I’m not in the restaurant business. I’m in the customer service business.” #ContentChat https://t.co/9mvCgDtXHQ

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

One way to ensure a cohesive experience: always take into consideration where your customer was before and where they’re going after for each interaction or step in their journey with your brand.

A5c: One simple trick for ensuring a cohesive experience is to ensure that every new or revised experience takes into consideration 1) where the customer was before they arrived at that part of the experience and 2) where the customer is going next. #ContentChat https://t.co/DFKm6awG0t

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

Test your customer experience and empower your team to make changes to improve that experience.

A5. Get everyone on the team on the same page — agree on the type of experience you want to offer. Then, empower your team to make quick, excellent experience-promoting decisions as they interact with leads, costumers, and everyone else. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

Giving your customer-facing employees the trust and ability to do right by your customers is so important.

I had the opposite of that experience with @apple last week (online and in-person) which really surprised me. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Founder @ErikaHeald Consulting (@SFerika) August 30, 2021

A5: Learn from the experience. Every brand or person managing the brand experience should have gone through the process themselves through a customer’s lens. If you are having difficulties, most likely a potential customer will as well. #ContentChat

— Cathrine Alexandra Nelson (@cathrinewith1e) August 30, 2021

Use brand guidelines and FAQ documents to ensure a consistent experience no matter how your customer engages with your brand.

A5: There’s a few ways to keep your audience immersed in the journey.

– Tone of voice should be the same online, in print, & on packaging

– Processes should be communicated & followed (FAQs)

– Social media can & should engage w/the audience in a meaningful way. #ContentChat

— Rachel Wendte (@rkwendte) August 30, 2021

Q6: As content marketers, how can we get started in creating better content experiences for our communities?

Listen to your customers. Monitor social media, conduct surveys, and review customer service call transcripts (or similar documents) to understand the challenges that your customers face and ways you can improve their experience.

A6a. Listen first, market second. Places to listen to customer feedback:

* #socialmedia
* Surveys
* #customerservice call/chat transcriptions
* JUST ASK THEM!#ContentChat https://t.co/4Pd0uDj2SB

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

A6: Listen to what they are wanting…look at analytics, trends, talk to them, be part of their conversations and be willing to make changes based on what their needs are and what problems you are looking to solve. #contentchat

— Bernie Fussenegger (@B2the7) August 30, 2021

A6: Spend a day in their shoes —Shopify store owners are Entreprenuer first, Marketer second #contentchat

— Chris (@chris_byrne) August 30, 2021

Create content that directly addresses your community questions and challenges.

A6: Always be thinking about the content that will solve a problem or help your customers’ work/life get a little easier. And look at what content they read, share, interact with. Write about what interests them and helps them. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 30, 2021

A6. As our content marketers, our job is to create clear, easy to understand content that answers lead and customer questions every step of the way. #ContentChat

— Masooma | Content Writer (@inkandcopy) August 30, 2021

A6.
💡Be on the lookout for their problems, needs + wishes to focus on
💡 See what others offer and provide something that provides more value and closes a gap
💡Listen and ask for feedback.
💡Provide and ensure high quality in all stages and #content pieces.#ContentChat

— Christian Lipp 🌱 (@SEMgalore) August 30, 2021

And create and deliver content in ways that your audience prefers.

A6: Love this question! It all starts with meeting the community where it is currently at. Understanding how members of the community consume content & providing the resources to amplify their current experience helps everyone. 1/2 #ContentChat https://t.co/xrIkfkGvMD

— Cathrine Alexandra Nelson (@cathrinewith1e) August 30, 2021

A6: Do members of the community engage through mobile devices, local resources such as libraries or individuals/organizations who support community members? Better content experiences come from understanding your audience & how to connect with them effectively. 2/2 #ContentChat

— Cathrine Alexandra Nelson (@cathrinewith1e) August 30, 2021

Often, this may involve helping customers and prospects solve problems even if it doesn’t lead to a sale. Company leaders need to be aware of and fully accept this fact.

A6b: Stay in your lane but be willing to help prospects and customers solve problems even if it doesn’t lead to a sale. #ContentChat https://t.co/4Pd0uDj2SB

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

Dan recommends the book They Ask, You Answer.

A6c: Read “They Ask, You Answer” by my friend @TheSalesLion. He teaches companies how to be the best educators in their industry, which is #contentmarketing genius. #ContentChat https://t.co/4Pd0uDj2SB

— Dan Gingiss – The Experience Maker (@dgingiss) August 30, 2021

Don’t be afraid to try new ideas. Not everything will work, but you can take your learnings and try something different.

A6: Always listen to your audience. Do your research. Come up with brilliant ideas but make sure they’ll work. Sometimes they won’t, and that’s ok – learn from those so you can be better next time. #ContentChat

— Christian McIlwain (@cpmcilwain) August 30, 2021

And ask yourself: is my content WISE?

A6b: And going back to @dgingiss’ earlier point about WISE – think about content that’s witty, immersive, shareable, extraordinary. #ContentChat

— Melanie Graham (@WriterGirlMel) August 30, 2021

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