August 1, 2022 Content Chat Recap: How To Identify And Partner With Industry Peers to Create Compelling Content

A Content Chat header image that says today's topic is how to identify and partner with industry peers to create compelling content with guest Dennis Shiao.

Your content marketing team shouldn’t limit itself to working with only internal thought leaders when creating content. Often, there are plenty of brand partners and viable industry experts who are ready to create engaging content with you—that is, of course, if you know how to find, invite, and effectively work with them.

In this #ContentChat, we’re joined by Dennis Shiao, founder of Attention Retention, to discuss how to identify and partner with industry peers to create compelling content. Read the full recap below to learn:

  • How to find and assess potential content partners
  • Ways to invite people to create content with you
  • The many types of content that are ripe for partnership!

Q1: Why can it be beneficial to partner with an industry partner or peer to create content?

There are many benefits of creating content with an industry partner or peer. A partner can add perspectives and insights that complement your own…

A1: A partner can add perspectives and insights that complement your own.

Also, as @crestodina often says, “a partner in creation is a partner in promotion.” #ContentChat https://t.co/4r08QBoCTT

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

Promote the content with their audience (expanding your potential reach)…

A1b: Also, a partner can promote the content to their audience, which may not have much overlap with your own (i.e., whole new audiences). #ContentChat

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

So true! Too often, content creators spend all their resources on content creation and forget about/run out of budget for the distribution. Partnership helps a bit with that aspect. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

This gives you + your content a “warm introduction” to potential new community members. That’s something paid distribution can’t do.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

A1: Industry/ peer benefits of creating content is reaching a larger audience with similar target audiences. It’s also great to have other voices on your platform that support your brand! #contentchat ~Jenna

— Nimble (@Nimble) August 1, 2022

Give your content added authority…

A1: Collaborating with industry thought leaders gives your content added authority and a wider range of perspectives and experience than working just with subject matter experts within your own organization.#ContentChat https://t.co/wK7S6CvI0x

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

A1: Creating content with a reputable industry peer or partner can help you…
– Lend credibility to your ideas
– Infuse diverse perspectives into your content
– Reach more people (assuming your partner promotes the content, too)#ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 1, 2022

A1: Working with a partner for content marketing allows you to leverage their authority and tap into new audiences #ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) August 1, 2022

And connect you with other content partners.

A1: Partnerships can create new opportunities, introduce new audiences, or provide additional partnerships introductions.#ContentChat https://t.co/YwThkYoWqj

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) August 1, 2022

Q2: Where can content marketers find viable partners or peers to create content with?

Join online and in-person meetups and conferences to connect with other content creators.

A2: Twitter chats (like this one!), online/in-person meetups and conferences. Also, find content in your industry that you love to consume and reach out to the people creating it. #ContentChat https://t.co/oMq5INyFJR

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

A2: I’ve met so many future content collaborators through Twitter, and from attending conferences like #CMworld and #MProfsB2B. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

Look to your company’s partners.

A2b: Look to your company’s own partners (e.g., resellers, integrators, consultants, etc.). Also find other companies in your industry who are not competitors.

Network for content as you’d network for business cards at an event. #ContentChat

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

Twitter and other social networks are great for finding industry content and connecting with peers.

A2. Try Twitter!

Or your existing network#ContentChat

— 🌗AmandaLaine (@_AmandaLaine) August 1, 2022

A2: Right here on Twitter, by reaching out to companies directly and also using keyword research to identify which companies have a similar audience to your own.#ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) August 1, 2022

A2: Finding content marketers can find partners to create with through your brands preferred social platforms! Twitter and Twitter chats are a great way to find peers. #contentchat ~Jenna

— Nimble (@Nimble) August 1, 2022

And we recommend you explore Slack groups (#CMworld’s is great!) or content sites like The Juice.

Hi! I made it! A2: The #CMWorld Slack group! Also, a new favorite resource of mine is @TheJuiceHQ! Lots of great content creators on there. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) August 1, 2022

I haven’t heard of The Juice — tell me more! #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

I was recently on a panel with their CEO, @JDGandolf, and he described it as “Spotify for B2B content”. It is a content curation site and you can build your own libraries or playlists. #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) August 1, 2022

Q3: How can you tell if a brand spokesperson or thought leader is a good fit for you to partner with on content?

Get to know your potential content partner before inviting them to collaborate. Read their content, follow them on social media, and listen to any of their audio content.

A3: Get to know them by reading their content, following them on social media, listening to their podcast.

Then if you want to get crazy, introduce yourself and ask if they’d like to set up an intro chat 😎 #ContentChat https://t.co/3pQbUrpIeG

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

It’s so important to spend the time to consume someone’s content before you invite them to collaborate. Just because someone has a big audience doesn’t mean they are necessarily a great fit for your content goals.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

And you can’t get an accurate gauge on someone based on ONE piece of their content or content posted in a short time period. It is a misstep to simply conduct keyword research, create a list of targets, and pitch. #ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 1, 2022

Find people who are willing to share their expertise.

A3: When evaluating a potential content collaborator, you want to assess the person’s willingness to be generous with their expertise, overlap with your community, and alignment with your organizational goals+values. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

That’s a great point. Sometimes a person could be the perfect fit, but not have time (or be interested) in collaborating.

Worse, they offer to collaborate, but don’t hold up their end of the bargain. #ContentChat

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

Ensure they align with your brand values.

A3: Research them! Look at their brand/website and who/what they’re talking about. Finding something of theirs that resonates with your brand is key. #contentchat ~Jenna

— Nimble (@Nimble) August 1, 2022

A3: Unsure if you should partner with someone on content? Ask these questions:
– Do they have industry knowledge?
– Are their values aligned with yours or your brand’s?
– Do they actively engage their communities on social media or through an email newsletter?#ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 1, 2022

And find someone whose goals complement yours.

Make sure there’s not just a connection but also alignment to some degree.#ContentChat

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) August 1, 2022

Agreed. You can connect with someone, but they may have drastically different POV and goals that don’t fit with what you are trying to do. It needs to be a win-win.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

Remember, though: You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take. If someone seems like a potential fit, reach out and see if they’re interested in collaborating!

My current favorite saying is “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) August 1, 2022

In Fans First about @TheSavBananas he reminds you to swing hard – because even though you might miss if you swing hard you’ll make an impact when you hit!#ContentChat

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) August 1, 2022

Q4: Can you share your strategies for approaching other content creators and inviting them to create content with you?

Dennis, Erika, and Jenna recommend you focus on engaging, conversing, and building a trusted relationship with your ideal content partner before you ever invite them to collaborate.

A4: Counterintuitive answer: don’t do it right away. Focus on engaging, conversing and building a trusted relationship.

Once you’ve built enough trust, you can ask and “of course!” is the answer you’ll get.

Or better yet: “Took you long enough to ask!” #ContentChat https://t.co/aoch4vUTRW

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

A4: As an introvert, whose email inbox is always full of random pitches from people I don’t know, I start by building a relationship with the person over time. Commenting on their content, engaging them in conversation. Then, when there’s an opportunity, I reach out. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

A4: The best way to first approaching other content creators to share content with you, is to share their content! Of course, sharing content because thats valuable to your audience. #contentchat ~Jenna

— Nimble (@Nimble) August 1, 2022

When approaching potential content partners, clearly explain what you want to create, why the partnership is a fit for you and them, and what you expect from the partner.

A4: When approaching potential content partners, clearly and concisely explain:
– What you want to create
– Why the partnership is a fit and valuable for both parties
– What you expect from the partner
#ContentChat

— Alek Irvin (@AlekIrvin) August 1, 2022

Q5: What types of content are a natural fit for co-creation? Do you have any examples you can share?

Any type of content can be a fit for co-creation, but some projects are easier to coordinate than others.

A5: I’d recommend it for ALL types of content, though of course, some of logistically easier to pull off than others.

Blog post? Really easy.
eBook? More involved, but still pretty easy.
Multimedia? Also more involved, but worth it.#ContentChat https://t.co/ptjbbNB0eR

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

Dennis likes the concept of an email newsletter swap.

A5b: Here’s one I haven’t seen, but like the concept:

Email newsletter swap.

Brand A contributes content to Brand B’s email newsletter.

Brand B reciprocates. #ContentChat

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

Long-form content is perfect for co-creation, including e-books and in-depth how-to articles.

A5: I love collaborating with others on any type of long-form content. From sidebars in e-books to quotes in meaty how-to blog posts, longer content allows your co-creators’ expertise and personality to shine through.#ContentChat https://t.co/CYebHxcxe9

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

Podcasts and webinars are a natural fit for collaboration.

A5: Podcasts and webinars are a great fit for co-creation. Any content type that shares thoughts/stories/values. #contentchat ~Jenna

— Nimble (@Nimble) August 1, 2022

A5A: This is gold! Real opportunity here. Especially if you link up with a charismatic podcaster. Can change the whole energy of your content marketing.#ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) August 1, 2022

A5: I LOVE doing interview or co-hosting type vidoes and podcasts.

Recently started up #HeSaidSheSaid LIVE with my hubby and having a blast (and folks seem to enjoy it).#ContentChat https://t.co/Muf53eat4q

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) August 1, 2022

https://t.co/m1vtgv8NMx

That’s our YouTube channel – and we’d love for more folks to subscribe :D#ContentChat

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) August 1, 2022

CMI Content partners with many marketing experts for its content.

A5b: Here’s an example of a blog post from @CMIContent that’s the result of a mass collaboration.https://t.co/6HrHaAyXcu

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

CMI does a great job inviting their #CMWorld presenters to contribute to posts like this one. #ContentChat

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

I love that they do this and I know it helps me get to know presenters whose sessions I seek out at the conference each year.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

Q6: What mistakes do content marketers often make when partnering with someone on content, and how can they avoid these mistakes?

Avoid these common mistakes when partnering with someone on content: Making assumptions about roles and responsibilities…

A6a: the most frequent mistake I’ve seen is making assumptions about who is going to do what. If you are co-creating content, you need to have a kickoff where you outline all the to-do’s, and who will complete them.#ContentChat https://t.co/XUTj5FAt28

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

A6b: For example, don’t assume someone is going to share your co-created content on every one of their social channels. They may have different objectives for the channels that don’t work with the specific content you’ve co-created. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

A6c: If I co-create marketing content, I’m happy to share it on Twitter and LinkedIn, but I rarely share it on Facebook (which includes many non-marketer friends), or on Instagram which is full of food + my garden + our pets.#ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

Not understanding the partner’s audience and how they built their community…

A6: Not knowing how they built their list. You might be swapping real subscribers for bought leads or worse spam. Ask first!#ContentChat

— Sweepsify (@Sweepsify_) August 1, 2022

Failing to appeal to both audiences…

A6: A mistake content marketers often make is not capturing both audiences. Sometimes co-created content gets lost into the everyday content. Make the co-creation content special! #contentchat ~Jenna

— Nimble (@Nimble) August 1, 2022

I agree. FOr example, if you share co-created content on social, and you never mention or tag your collaborators, that’s a HUGE missed opportunity. #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

Thinking a content partner can solve all of your challenges…

A6: Anytime you think someone else will be your “answer” then you are setting yourself up to be disappointed.#ContentChat

— Kathryn Lang – hopesmith and dream ignitor (@Kathrynclang) August 1, 2022

Or simply not pursuing a content partnership!

A6: Of course I could say that partnering doesn’t always work out, but …

I think the biggest mistake is not pursuing it in the first place! You might have an excuse or two to rationalize not taking action, but hopefully this chat inspires some to jump to it 🏃‍♀️🏃‍♂️ #ContentChat https://t.co/FHHbe2YWVo

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

Q7: Besides co-creating content, what other activities can you engage in with industry peers?

We recommend you partner with peers and industry thought leaders for conferences, networking events and local meet-ups, podcasts, webinars, social media Q&As… the opportunities are endless.

A7: This might still be considered co-creation, but…

Start a podcast or a webinar series and invite industry peers to be guests and/or presenters. Bonus points for re-purposing their spots for other types of content. #ContentChat https://t.co/sYimglKakR

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

A7b: Organize in-person gatherings for the peers who are local to a given area. I happen to like brew pubs, but coffee shops and restaurants work great as well. #ContentChat

— Dennis Shiao (he/him) ✍️ (@dshiao) August 1, 2022

A7: I’ve worked with my #contentmarketing peers to co-present at conferences, co-host networking events, and co-lead community spaces. So many activities that work better together.#ContentChat https://t.co/SY1lO81bFf

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

A7b: And a shout-out to these frequent co-collaborators: @NeoLuxeMo @amywhiggins @carmenhill @bhrome @PamDidner #ContentChat

— Erika Heald | Content Marketing Consultant (@SFerika) August 1, 2022

A7: Recognizing and engaging with industry peers! Sharing ideas and conversations opens opportunities and networks! #contentchat ~Jenna

— Nimble (@Nimble) August 1, 2022

A7: Share knowledge, give advice, support their efforts! @dshiao is great at this! #ContentChat

— Andi Robinson (@hijinxmarketing) August 1, 2022

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